Freestyle Football

Freestyle Football Association

The World Freestyle Football Association

World governing body of Freestyle Football and its structure

All you need is a ball

The World Freestyle Football Association is world governing body for the sport of freestyle football. It is committed to growing awareness of and participation in freestyle football worldwide.

Anyone can get into freestyle football – all you need is a ball! It is the art and sport of juggling a football using all parts of the body to entertain audiences and outperform opponents in competitions. It is a fusion of tricks with a ball, dance and music.

The Association owns the World Freestyle Football Championships and have created a rankings system and support structure that allows anyone to pick up a ball and not only enjoy the sport, but also develop their own pathway to becoming a professional.

The Association has been established upon a backbone of community development and education. This means we recognise the power this exciting sport has to inspire healthy active lifestyles for young people all over the world. Aside from growing the sport as a full time profession for the athletes, the Association is committed to teaching key life skills, nutrition and academics through freestyle football. 

Clinics

There are 106 country members in the network, which means a registered group of people and organisations in 106 countries of the world are committed to growing freestyle football as a sport in its own right and to delivering the social opportunity through the sport too.

Whilst there are just over 10,000 freestyle football athletes in the world right now, the total number of people who participate and enjoy freestyle football can be paralleled to mainstream football, because everyone who plays football will juggle with the ball at some stage and this forms the foundation of freestyle. Therefore one could suggest that participation is estimated at over 400 million, with a direct audience of 1.47 billion football fans around the globe who enjoy the entertainment of freestyle football.

Freestyle Football is however a completely different discipline to football (soccer) when you get really into the sport. It is about pushing the body to extreme limits, allowing creativity to flow and owning the ball in your own unique way.

Training freestyle football can dramatically build core fundamental skills that are useful in all aspects of life and across other sport disciplines. These include body awareness, balance, rhythm, control, touch, co-ordination and more intrinsic benefits such as self-confidence, respect, patience and taking responsibility.

Freestyle Football has something for everyone. It is a sport that allows males and females equal rights and that absolutely anyone can enjoy from whatever environment they find themselves in. The World Freestyle Football Association was created to make sure everyone gets the chance to be recognized as part of a community.

The World Freestyle Football Association is a non-profit organisation registered in the Canada (Company number 1041184-1).

the Sport

Freestyle Football and its history

Football Freestyle is the art of doing tricks with a football. However if you scratch the surface you'll soon discover that it's more than just tricks. For freestylers today it's an art form, a sport and a lifestyle. It's difficult to pin point the exact moment in time where freestyle truly began.

Over 2000 years ago games such as Chinlone, Jianzi and Sepak Takraw in Southern and South East Asia all embraced many skills that relate directly to the art and sport as we know it today, but where freestyle football really began to form was in the 20th century. When you think about fundamental freestyle tricks such as the 'Neck Stall' and 'Around The World’; These were first performed in the 1800’s by circus performers such as Enrico Rastelli and Francis Brunn. If you watch videos of their performances today you can see many similarities to every modern day freestyler.

Despite the tricks, this was not 'freestyle football' - it was juggling. It wasn't until the 1980’s that freestyle became strongly associated to football. Diego Maradona, probably the best footballer in the world at that time, was the first person to perform these fundamental moves on a global stage and this pushed football freestyle into existence. Mr Woo and Kang Sung Min, two South Korean freestylers, would train with a football for up to 8 hours a day developing this new found art form. Later it was Mr Woo who carried freestyle football through the nineties virtually alone, showcasing new tricks such as sole juggling to audiences all over the world.

Even then, freestyle football was considered a novelty and only practiced by a handful of people across the globe. For freestyle football to develop it needed another push. At the beginning of the new millennium several significant events helped propel freestyle football into a new era, giving it an identity for the first time. Brazilian football icon Ronaldinho starred in Nike commercials, alongside Mr Woo, which glamorised freestyle. Soufiane Touzani, from the Netherlands introduced a new style of lower tricks and thanks to the internet and the fast developing mobile industry these videos travelled like wild fire. Suddenly everybody knew what freestyle football was. This inspired millions and freestyle football as we know it began.

Now globally known as freestyle football, a sport was born. Freestylers began to realise that there were no rules and no limitations. Different styles were developed such as; lowers, uppers, sitdowns, grounds and blocking. Because of the huge influx of newcomers to the sport, there was a sudden urgency to leave your own mark on the culture, meaning that the difficulty and level quickly rose. The next step for freestyle football to continue evolving and developing was to host live competitions. Battling one on one for national, continental and world titles would give freestylers a new sense of meaning to their daily training. The first major competition of this kind was Red Bull Street Style in 2008, which was hosted in Sao Paolo, Brazil. Sean Garnier won this competition with a style and look that hadn’t been seen in the public eye before. All of this meant that freestyle football was becoming a sport in its own right. 

 

The World Freestyle Football Association was established by leading freestylers and personnel from within the scene to develop support and structure for this exciting culture and sport.

Super Ball; the first 'open' world championship, where anybody can compete opened up the competitive side of the sport to new possibilities. It created competitions within the event, which would cater for freestylers with ranging styles, recognising that there is not just one true way to judge a freestyler. It was and is a competition for freestylers, by freestylers. Super Ball is now an annual event hosted in the Czech Republic and has become somewhat of an annual pilgrimage for freestylers from all corners of the world to come together and celebrate the culture and progress of freestyle football.

In 2015, legendary footballer and icon for freestyle football Ronaldinho was recognised by the World Association as ambassador for the sport.

Today competitions are organised across all habitable contents and videos are being shared by millions of people on a monthly basis.

Rules

Events / Competitions / Judges

2017 Official Rules of Freestyle Football Competitions

Produced by Freestyle Football Federation. Released 7th January 2014. Updated 14th November 2017

Member Subassociations:
EFFA - European Freestyle Football Association
NAFFA - North American Freestyle Football Association
SAFFA - South American Freestyle Football Association 
APFFA - Asia - Pacific Freestyle Football Association
AFFA - African Freestyle Football Association

This document outlines the core components and official rules of freestyle football competitions that are acknowledged by the World Freestyle Football Association (WFFA).

 This is to be seen as the minimum requirements for any event worldwide, although they can be altered to suit the needs of non‐official events (events in which no world rankings points are available) if appropriate.

 As world body for freestyle football development, WFFA have created criteria for a globally recognized judging structure and format. This is developed with input from freestylers across the globe to ensure accuracy.

 All official national and international events in the WFFA network must adhere to these criteria and it is expected that anyone else organizing freestyle football events will incorporate this system to ensure satisfaction from all participants.

WFFA has educated a team of official judges that can be offered to any event anywhere if required. They are experienced individuals who have worked with the sport of freestyle football extensively as athletes and officials. It is understood by WFFA that any judge of any freestyle football event must be actively involved in the sport of freestyle. Judges don’t always have to be active freestylers, as long as they can accurately assess the sport and understand all the criteria below well (see point 2.1.4)

 

Contents
  1. World Ranking
    1. Entry details
    2. Event Weighting
    3. Points
  2. Rules and Regulations
    1. Qualification Stage
      1. Qualification with up to 20 players
      2. Qualification with more than 20 players
    2. Knockout stage
      1. General
      2. Footballs
      3. Usage of hands
      4. Judges
      5. Judging criteria
      6. Timing
  3. Additional regulations
    1. Protesting
    2. Disrespecting opponents
    3. Penalty
      1. Reporting
      2. Process
      3. Conclusion

  1. 1.0. World Ranking

    1.1. Entry details

    • The season for these events runs from 1st January to 31st December each year
    • WFFA recognized events must be open for anyone to enter in the first round
    • To have the right to gain points and participate in National (1-star) events, freestylers must identify themselves with their corresponding passport or ID card. Freestylers not living in their country of birth or with duel nationalities must choose whether they will represent their country of birth or another (in which they must have a valid residence permit/passport for).
    • To have the right to gain points and participate in a continental (2-star) event, freestylers must identify themselves with their corresponding passport or ID card. Freestylers can only participate in the Continental championship that corresponds with the 1-star event that they have already chosen to represent
    • Exceptions of this rule are taken into consideration only in unique cases of change location of athletes’ residency in certain country. WFFA must be aware of the situation and will approve/deny the request.
    • Freestylers cannot enter an event in a country or continent which they have not nominated for
    • Player with dual nationalities are not allowed to change their country of allegiance during more than once in lifetime. Only unique cases will be taken into consideration and discussed on annual committee meeting.

    1.2. Event Weighting
    1. Athlete can only gather points for world ranking from maximum of 3 events in a year

      • 1 x 1 Star Event – National Championship
      • 1 x 2 Star Event – Continental Championship
      • 1 x 3 Star Event – World Open Championship

      WFFA recognizes that some countries have larger number of participants and standard of freestyler. To compensate this an Event Weighting system is be introduced on Area Level tier system. This system allows the best athletes to be recognized at any circumstances.

      Area Level = how strong is local scene represented compared to the world according to different strength factors (except world open championship). Tiers are created by Sub-committee members and respected members of community.

      Strength factors within areas:

      • Number of world class athletes
      • Number of world and continental participants
      • Number of world and continental champions
      • Number of athletes in country
      • Number of participants on national championship
      • Event history

      Area Level tiers examples

      Tier

      National

      Continental

      G-6

      Poland, Mexico, Colombia, Brazil, Russia, Japan

       

      Strong

      Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Ukraine, UK, China, India, Indonesia, Iran, Turkey, UAE, Vietnam, Australia, Chile, Morocco, USA

      Europe, South America, Asia - Pacific

      Medium

      Algeria, Argentina, Austria, Belarus, Belgium, Bolivia, Brunei, Croatia, Czech republic, Egypt, Ghana, Greece, Guatemala, Ireland, Kazakhstan, Kenya, KSA, Malaysia, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Serbia, South Africa, South Korea, Thailand, Uruguay

      North America, Africa

      Low

      Singapore, Canada, Afghanistan, Ecuador, Switzerland, Slovakia, Portugal, Kuwait…

       

      1.3. Points

      National

      Tier

      Winner

      Runner up

      3rd place

      4th place

      Quarter

      Top 16

      Elimination

      Entry

      G-6

      125

      75

      55

      45

      25

      10

      5

      1

      Strong

      120

      70

      50

      40

      25

      10

      5

      1

      Medium

      110

      60

      45

      35

      15

      6

      3

      1

      Low

      100

      50

      35

      30

      10

      4

      2

      1

       

      Continental

      Tier

      Winner

      Runner up

      3rd place

      4th place

      Quarter

      Top 16

      Elimination

      Entry

      Strong

      250

      150

      110

      90

      45

      25

      10

      1

      Medium

      230

      135

      100

      85

      40

      20

      10

      1

                       

       

      World Open

      Winner

      Runner up

      3rd place

      4th place

      Quarter

      Top 16

      Top 32

      Elimination

      Entry

      500

      300

      210

      180

      90

      45

      20

      10

      1

       

  2. 2.0.  Rules and Regulations

    1. 2.1.  Qualification Stage

      The stage is designed to qualify the strongest participants for the final round. It is really important to do this properly to avoid unhappy athletes and ensure all runs on time.

      • For official WFFA National Events (1-star) there must be minimum of 8 participants registered.
      • For official WFFA Continental Event (2-star) there must be minimum of 16 participants registered
      • If your event looks like having less competitors than the minimum it can still be classed as an official event but points will be weighted lower.

      Each competition will have different numbers of participants, so WFFA have identified the two following options that must be used at qualification stage:

      • 1 minute Performance (up to 20 participants)
      • Battle Circles (more than 20 participants)

      2.1.1. Qualification with less than 20 participants

      • Each participant must make a 1 minute performance.
      • To determine the starting order of the freestylers for this round there is a general seeding of players (this could be based on WFFA world rankings or results from previous championships for example). If no previous event has previously happened then names will be drawn out of a hat.
      • Athletes perform in order from last to first in accordance with the seeding.
      • There must be at least a top 8 for the 1-star events and a top 16 for 2-star events.
      • Judges rank participants in order from the best to the worst performance (see point 2.2.4 for judging criteria).
      • To give maximum opportunity in some countries for new freestylers to develop and learn, it could be managed so the top 12 from National rankings go through automatically and then for the final 4 places in the top 16 for battles, a qualification round can be made.
      • Final top 16 order is made (see point 2.2.6 for exact order).
      • In case there are exactly 16 participants, the qualification will determine only the order of athletes from 1st to 16th place.
      • Qualification could be modified for top 32 battles or top 8 battles in the final stage. It all depends on time management of the event and the organisers.
      • The same rules as knockout stage apply (see point 2.2.).

      1. 2.1.2. Qualification with more than 20 participants

        • To determine the starting order of the freestylers for this round there is a general seeding of athletes (could be based on the WFFA world rankings or results from previous championships).
        • There are 4 groups of athletes created based on the seeding.
        • Every athlete is in a group of four meaning they all have three opponents to compete against.
        • All players are in a circle and battling each other.
        • The number of circles depends on the number of athletes registered to compete.
        • Every athlete has three rounds, which last 30 seconds each.
        • Athletes each take their turn in the center of the circle.
        • After each round, the athlete should move from the center spot quickly back to their corner to make room for the next athlete.
        • The two best athletes from every circle goes through to the next round (could be more or less depending on the number of circles).
        • Those two winning athletes are announced straight after each circle battle by the head judge after a short general discussion between the judges.
        • The same rules as knockout stage apply (see point 2.2.1).
    2. 2.2. Knockout Stage 

      1. 2.2.1. General

        • Participants can use their own ball (see point 2.2)
        • Hands are NOT allowed (see point 2.3)
        • Judges will be picking the winner on overall performance (see point 2.4)
        • Foreign objects cannot be integrated into the battles (E.g. bottles, rope etc.)
        • Participants must not leave the stage at any time during the battle
        • No other people are allowed to be brought into battle
        • Dropped ball after trick attempt is not considered as anything else than drop
        • Any action after the time limit does not count into the performance, however if the ball is dropped it is considered as mistake
        • No outside interference in holding the ball to body (E.g. glue, tape, laces etc.)
        • Whilst one participant is performing, the opponent must not perform any moves or infringe upon their show
        • Changing equipment (shoes, ball) is not allowed during battle
        • Impersonating of the opponent is allowed, but disrespecting is strictly forbidden. There is a very fine line here and collectively the judges shall decide if anyone is acting inappropriately (See point2)
      2. 2.2.2. Footballs

        • Every freestyler is allowed to use his or her own football.
        • FFF recognises that ball of size 5 is preferable choice. Nevertheless there is tolerance of 0,5 both ways (4.5 and 5.5).
        • It is strictly prohibited to use more than one ball in battle.
        • Surface of the ball and tricks performed with it are considered by judges
        • No modification to ball is allowed.
        • In case there is official ball of tournament requested to be used by all players on stage organization is obliged to send this ball to every participant at least 1 month before so he can get used to it. This exception must be approved by FFF and communicated to athletes in advance.
      3. 2.2.3. The use of hands
        • It is forbidden to touch the ball with hands in battle with no exception
        • Every use of hand is considered as mistake
        • By hand understand “from shoulder to end of fingers
      4. 2.2.4 Judges and Judging

        • There must be even number of judges (minimum of 3 and a maximum of 5).
        • All must be associated with freestyle football and active in the scene for more than 4 years and approved by FFF expert in first stage of organization. FFF will make suggestions if the judges are felt to be inappropriate.
        • Judges need to be perfectly aware of what they are asked to do and briefed properly following judging criteria.
        • Head judge is responsible for the whole panel regarding timing, distribution of sheets and proper briefing. He is the middle man of event director towards the judging panel.
        • All judges are given judging sheets and blank papers with pen so they can make notes. They are obliged to focus 100% on happening on stage.
        • After every battle judges are given at least 40 seconds to decide about result of battle. If judge is not ready he needs to give clear signal to host to not require the results yet.
        • When the decision is made, each judge should hold the card of winner in his hands and look directly to stage so host can see, judges are ready for announcement. In case of name cards are not present judges look to stage.
        • As soon as host requires, judges show their decision.
        • In case of final battle, each judge writes the name of his winner to piece of paper and hands it to Head judge. Head judge needs to write the name down as well before revealing the results from other judges. Then Head judge reveals the results and shows it to other judges so everyone is aware of final decision. Head judge then walks to stage, grabs finalists by hand, builds the suspension and on signal from host rises hand of the winner.
        • Judges should all have a short explanation detailing why they made the decision they have at the time they announce the winner of a battl In case they are asked, they must be able to defend their decision.
        • Judges decision is final and cannot be changed.
        • Judges are strictly not allowed to talk at any time between start of battle and announcement of result of the same battle.
        • Judge is not allowed to use so called "blank vote" in case he is not sure with result. There must be a decision.

        2.2.5 Judging criteria

        The 3 judges will be looking for 3 basic criteria in battles. Each criteria includes 5 sub-criteria It involves a mixture of subjective opinions and technical qualifications. Judges are obliged to consider these criteria: 

        • Difficulty – Technical difficulty of tricks and combinations
          • All round skills – general ability to perform all parts of sport equally
          • Dynamics – strength and speed of movements
          • Response – reaction to opponents’ round
          • Difficult moves – how difficult in general is to reach the perfection of trick
          • Combinations – ability to create difficult connection between tricks
        • Originality – Performing with individual style, creativity and variety
          • Variety within battle – ability to not repeat tricks within the battle
          • Variety in general – ability to not repeat tricks in competition
          • Original move – unusual tricks or signature moves
          • Attitude – creating battle vibe and adding the value to performance
          • Element of surprise - surprising move which is unexpected due to circumstances
        • Execution – Clean and controlled demonstration of each trick
          • Cleanness – clean execution of tricks
          • Control – general control of the ball on stage
          • Style – the way trick are performed
          • Mistakes – dropping the ball or creating mistake
          • Flow – ability to move the ball around body with no hesitation
        1. 2.2.6. Timing

          • Each battle lasts 3 minutes
          • Athletes take turns every 30 seconds which means both athletes will have the ball 3 times during every battle
          • Athlete is announced by host (or sound system) that his round is ending at least 5 seconds in advance.
          • There are additional 5 seconds between single rounds for athlete to finish his round and free the space to his opponent.
          • If athlete ends his round earlier opponent has advantage of using this time in his round.
          • In case of athlete having longer round opponent has right to take time, which has been stolen from him, from player’s next round (is announced by host)
        2. 2.2.7. Graphical demonstration of the battle schedule 

        3.  

          Graphical battle sheet

  3. 3.0.  Additional regulations

    1. 3.1.  Protesting

      • If there are any complaints or protests during the tournament, make sure you notify the tournament director straight after the event.
      • If anyone is unclear about the rules, then any questions should be raised before the event begins. No complaints concerning rules will be considered once the event has started.
      • The judges should never be approached at any time throughout the duration of the event. Their decision is final and all participants should respect that. Anyway every participant has right decision which influenced his performance to be explained.
    2. 3.2. Disrespecting opponents 

      • Within the format of the battles, successful performers will react to the situation, the music being played by the DJ and to the skills presented by their opponent.
      • At times there may be a fine line between impersonating the opponent and their moves and offending them in the heat of a battle.
      • With the nature of any freestyle football event now, content will be produced for TV, Mobile and Internet usage almost instantly if not broadcasted live anyway. Therefore with FFF promoting Freestyle Football around the world as a healthy lifestyle choice for young people and pushing the athletes as role models for others, it is essential that the sport is perceived correctly.
      • If the judges feel that any participant acts with any form of major disrespect to their opponents or judges themselves, host of the event may (after consulting the judges) highlights this by way of a warning to the participant. If he continues, then judges have the right to stop the battle and eliminate the athlete.
      • Forms of disrespect could take the form of (but not be limited to) racism, negative references to opponent’s family members of upbringing, general bullying and references to alcohol or drug abuse.
    3. 3.3. Penalty 

      General Penalty Committee is formed in each continent sustaining from sub-committee members. Matters of this committee is part of continental committee meeting once every second month.

      3.3.1    Reporting

      • Violation of rules could be reported by anyone present or not present at the event where violation was spotted
      • Violation against rules needs to be presented to Head judge. He then delivers the message to Event director. Event director reports to sub-committee member of his region and he then presents it as part of agenda for meeting
      • Violation of rules needs to be provided with clear evidence. Assumptions are not considered as valid subject
      • If the violation is spotted immediately, person who is involved is left with one warning. If the violation should repeat, person could be disqualified
      • Reporter is responsible for punishment proposal

      3.3.2    Process

      • Only serious violations and violation which is not spotted personally are worth reporting it to General Penalty Committee.
      • General Penalty Committee has the right to not take unimportant violation into consideration. This needs to be announced to reporter.
      • Violator must be aware of the process and has the chance to offer defence. Defence could be in form of acceptance and apology. This is taken into consideration in process of measuring punishment.
      • The case is discussed with considering both punishment proposal from reporter and defence from violator. It could but does not have to be decision making factor
      • After discussion and review of rules meeting leader propose the conclusion. All members must vote including meeting leader himself
      • General Penalty Committee meeting report is constructed with conclusion

      3.3.3    Conclusion

      • Result of meeting with all details is presented to both Violator and Reporter
      • Both have right to request second calling with serious reasoning only
      • Second calling could but does not have to happen depending on members of General Penalty Committee
      • After conclusion is accepted, it is announced publicly online and archived

Network

Worldwide database of players
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Ranking

World ranking / How it works
World list - Top 400How it works
Ranking from previous years: 2014, 2015
#NameNicknameCountryPts.starstarstarstarstarstar
This page is dedicated to providing you with the official freestyle events being organized around the world.
 
In 2012, WFFA members introduced a rankings system, that means by participating in certain events a freestyler can accumulate points, which will count towards their overall world ranking postition. Not every single event is included in this. The system is focused on a very basic model to ensure long term sustainability for the sport can be achieved and those winnin championships are rewarded accordingly. Therefore for the purposes of the world rankings, only 3 types of events are considered:

For anyone organizing an event, make sure you email info@thewffa.org to register it on the world freestyle calendar. WFFA is keen to support and promote all events in the sport/art of freestyle football, so even if your event cannot be classified to qualify for world ranking point, we could still help.

We encourage everyone to take part in as many events as possible (even non-WFFA accredited events) to gain experience. Online competiotions are not rewarded with points. The rankings system is in place to determine every year who ultimately the most successful freestyler around the world is. WFFA believes a true winner is somebody who has the ability to perform both the art and sport of freestyle football on a consistently world class level.

World Freestyle Football Rankings

All athletes with points gained from WFFA registered events are listed on the 'Ranking' page. The points are awarded based on success in regional and International events across all continents. Every December 31st the list will be updated to then determine who are the best athletes on the world for each year.
 
Participation in Events
 
Freestylers may only compete in one official national and continental event each year in order to build up their world ranking points. If someone has dual nationalities, they must:
A continental event is open for anyone who represents a country in that continent to enter (or in some instances at least the qualifiers for it are open for anyone). A world open event is open for anyone to enter!
 
There are many more events all over the world that we would encourage anyone to participate in to build experience and consistency in performance. As the sport grows further WFFA will look for ways to build more events into the points system.
 
World Communication Network
 
See section "Network" on this website to view a comprehensive list of all members of WFFA. In case of any issue from your region, you will find representative person who you should talk to. That person is then responsible to deliver this issue to WFFA representatives.
 

Partners

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Top Athletes

General info

The Freestyle Football World Masters is a World Championship event visiting major cities around the world. The participants are the top 16 freestyle football athletes in world today, as determined by the World Rankings published by the World Freestyle Football Association at the end of each year. They are all competing throughout various challenges to ultimately win the title of Freestyle Football World Masters Champion.

Freestyle Football can be uniquely identified as a SpArt. It is a mixture of an ‘Art’, which involves performing choreographed routines to music with a football and a ‘Sport’ as athletes then compete head to head over 3-minute knockout battles with judges scoring them on Originality, Execution and Technical difficulty.

Event History

The World Freestyle Masters came out from the Freestyle Football World Tour which was created as a one off event in 2011 in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The events was won by the UK's Andrew Henderson.

Kuala Lumpur 1st event

In 2013 the World Tour was staged in 2 venues, London UK & Dubai, UAE. The year was dominated by Poland Michryc who won both events and the Overall World Tour Crown.

In 2014 World Tour was hosted in amazing city of Beijing, China and returned to London once more to famous O2 arena. Carlos Iacon from Argentina finished on second place each of the event but accumulating the most points overall he became a champion of World Tour 2014.

After one year break in 2015, World Tour has come back with 2016 edition starting in Calgary, Canada with first leg and finishing in Melbourne, Australia with incredible set up and PR acitivities. This year was dominated by unstoppable englishman Andrew Henderson.

In 2017 there has been another break and with 2018 the World Freestyle Masters was created to focus on one event per year only and make it unforgettable experience for every participant. Hosting the first official World Freestyle Masters event in Tokyo, Japan together with World Street Soccer Championship and DAZN as a title partner, WFFA believes in bright future of this event.

Hosting an Freestyle Football World Masters Event
If your city would like to host a Freestyle Football World Tour Event then applications are now currently open to host a 2018 and 2019 Event.

If you are interested in receiving a Host City Pack then please get in contact with us by emailing info@thewffa.org 

How to Qualify For the Freestyle Football World Masters

Freestylers anywhere in the world can earn points by competing in events that are recognised by the World Freestyle Football Association as either 1, 2 or 3-star competitions. These points are accumulated throughout each calendar year and go towards their position in the World Rankings. 1-Star events are national championships. 2-star events are continental opens and there is one 3-star event each year, which is Super Ball. There are many more competitions each year outside of the world ranking qualifiers, in which Freestylers can also be recognised for a chance to win one of the Wild Card spaces in the Freestyle Football World Masters.

Note: In event of a Freestyler qualifying twice (ie through Top 8 on 2013 Tour & Top 6 in World Rankings) then the spot is offered to following player in ranking.

Event Format & Rules

Beijing finalThe competition is held in well known battle format.  

Battles are 3 minutes long with each freestyler having 3 x 30 second rounds to outperform each other and impress the judges. At this stage, technical difficulty of the tricks and how each freestyler responds to their opponent are also critical factors for the judges to consider.

Freestylers have to abide by the Battle Rules which can be seen here

Judges are established freestylers who are held in high regard by the community and are knowledgeable on the rapidly progressing tricks within the sport.

There are 3 judges in each event who will decide instantly the result of each battle without consulting each other.

 

Top Athletes

Top 16 - Player profiles
Jesse Marlet
Jesse

Michal Rycaj
Michryc

Tobias Brandal Busaet
Tobias

Erlend Fagerli
Erlend

Gautier Jean-Marie André Fayolle
Gautier

Szymon Maciej Skalski
Szymo

Brynjar Fagerli
Brynjar

Lukasz Czeslaw Chwieduk
Luki

Sebastian Ortiz Hernandez
Boyka

Pedro Henrique de Oliveira Duarte
Pedrinho

Philip Warren Gertsson
PWG

Esteban Hernandez Acosta
El Pantera

Yo Katsuyama
Yo

Ricardo Chahini de Araujo
Ricardinho

Jordan Valentino Morisson
Jordan

Emil Källdoff
Källdoff



Ranking

Ranking / Top 16
NameNicknameCountryPts. stage 1Pts. stage 2Pts. stage 3Total pts.
Brynjar FagerliBrynjarNorway000---
Emil KälldoffKälldoffSweden000---
Erlend FagerliErlendNorway000---
Esteban Hernandez AcostaEl PanteraMexico000---
Gautier Jean-Marie André FayolleGautierFrance000---
Jesse MarletJesseNetherlands000---
Jordan Valentino MorissonJordanAustralia000---
Lukasz Czeslaw ChwiedukLukiPoland000---
Michal RycajMichrycPoland000---
Pedro Henrique de Oliveira DuartePedrinhoBrazil000---
Philip Warren GertssonPWGPhilippines000---
Ricardo Chahini de AraujoRicardinhoBrazil000---
Sebastian Ortiz HernandezBoykaColombia000---
Szymon Maciej SkalskiSzymoPoland000---
Tobias Brandal BusaetTobiasNorway000---
Yo KatsuyamaYoJapan000---
Events
2018 - May
May 2018
SundayMondayTuesdayWednesdayThursdayFridaySaturday
29th April30th April
1st
2nd
3rd
4th
5th
Freestyle Foci RBSS Világbajnoki Selejtező X Dunai Regatta 2018
Budapest
5th
Kimberley/ South African Champioships
Kimberley
6th
7th
8th
9th
10th
11th
12th
Abierto Nacional Chile
Santiago
12th
Bata Freestyle
Buenos Aires
13th
14th
15th
16th
17th
18th
Ukraine Football Freestyle Championship 2018
Kyiv
18th
Turkish Freestyle Football Championship
Izmir
19th
19th
20th
21st
22nd
23rd
24th
25th
26th
Belarussian freestyle football cup
Minsk
27th
28th
29th
30th
31st
1st June2nd June
Create request for event
Key
Super ball 2017
After 3 years in Liberec this massive event returned back to Prague to crown world champion 2017

Super ball 2017

After 3 years in Liberec this massive event returned back to Prague to crown world champion 2017
Freestyle Origins - Ricardo Araujo "Ricardinho" (Brazil)
Unique documentary about the best freestylers around the world.

Freestyle Origins - Ricardo Araujo "Ricardinho" (Brazil)

Unique documentary about the best freestylers around the world.
Freestyle Origins - Sebastian Ortiz "Boyka" (Colombia)
Unique documentary about the best freestylers around the world.

Freestyle Origins - Sebastian Ortiz "Boyka" (Colombia)

Unique documentary about the best freestylers around the world.
Freestyle Origins - Esteban Acosta (Mexico)
Unique documentary about the best freestylers around the world.

Freestyle Origins - Esteban Acosta (Mexico)

Unique documentary about the best freestylers around the world.
Freestyle Origins - Lukasz Chwieduk "Luki" (Poland)
Unique documentary about the best freestylers around the world.

Freestyle Origins - Lukasz Chwieduk "Luki" (Poland)

Unique documentary about the best freestylers around the world.
Freestyle Origins - Erlend Fagerli (Norway)
Unique documentary about the best freestylers around the world.

Freestyle Origins - Erlend Fagerli (Norway)

Unique documentary about the best freestylers around the world.
Freestyle Origins - Gauiter Fayolle (France)
Unique documentary about the best freestylers around the world.

Freestyle Origins - Gauiter Fayolle (France)

Unique documentary about the best freestylers around the world.
Freestyle Origins - Daniel Mikolajek "Mikolaj" (Poland)
Unique documentary about the best freestylers around the world.

Freestyle Origins - Daniel Mikolajek "Mikolaj" (Poland)

Unique documentary about the best freestylers around the world.
Freestyle Origins - Guillermo Vaz "M3mo" (Mexico)
Unique documentary about the best freestylers around the world.

Freestyle Origins - Guillermo Vaz "M3mo" (Mexico)

Unique documentary about the best freestylers around the world.
Freestyle Origins - Szymon Skalski "Szymo" (Poland)
Unique documentary about the best freestylers around the world.

Freestyle Origins - Szymon Skalski "Szymo" (Poland)

Unique documentary about the best freestylers around the world.
Freestyle Origins -Philip Warren Gertsson "PWG" (Philippines/Norway)
Unique documentary about the best freestylers around the world.

Freestyle Origins -Philip Warren Gertsson "PWG" (Philippines/Norway)

Unique documentary about the best freestylers around the world.
Freestyle Origins -Jovanny Gonzalez "Gio" (Mexico)
Unique documentary about the best freestylers around the world.

Freestyle Origins -Jovanny Gonzalez "Gio" (Mexico)

Unique documentary about the best freestylers around the world.
Freestyle Origins - Michal Rycaj "Michryc"
Unique documentary about the best freestylers around the world.

Freestyle Origins - Michal Rycaj "Michryc"

Unique documentary about the best freestylers around the world.
Freestyle Origins - Jhonny Peňa (Colombia)
Unique documentary about the best freestylers around the world.

Freestyle Origins - Jhonny Peňa (Colombia)

Unique documentary about the best freestylers around the world.
Freestyle Origins - Carlos Iacono "Charly" (Argentina)
Unique documentary about the best freestylers around the world.

Freestyle Origins - Carlos Iacono "Charly" (Argentina)

Unique documentary about the best freestylers around the world.
Freestyle Origins - Tobias Brandal Busaet (Norway)
Unique documentary about the best freestylers around the world.

Freestyle Origins - Tobias Brandal Busaet (Norway)

Unique documentary about the best freestylers around the world.
Freestyle Origins - Pawel Skóra (Poland)
Unique documentary about the best freestylers around the world.

Freestyle Origins - Pawel Skóra (Poland)

Unique documentary about the best freestylers around the world.
Freestyle Origins - Marvin Rodriguez (Mexico)
Unique documentary about the best freestylers around the world.

Freestyle Origins - Marvin Rodriguez (Mexico)

Unique documentary about the best freestylers around the world.
Freestyle Origins - Andrew Henderson (UK)
Unique documentary about the best freestylers around the world.

Freestyle Origins - Andrew Henderson (UK)

Unique documentary about the best freestylers around the world.
European championship 2017
Football festival Soccerex in Manchester, UK hosted the best freestylers from Europe to crown its champion for 2017

European championship 2017

Football festival Soccerex in Manchester, UK hosted the best freestylers from Europe to crown its champion for 2017
World Tour 2016 - Melbourne
After Calgary top 16 athletes clashed once again to gain final points to become ultimate world champion

World Tour 2016 - Melbourne

After Calgary top 16 athletes clashed once again to gain final points to become ultimate world champion
Asian Championship 2016
Davao city, Philippines hosted the best athletes from Asia to crown Asian champion 2016

Asian Championship 2016

Davao city, Philippines hosted the best athletes from Asia to crown Asian champion 2016
Red Bull Street Style - World final 2016
Red Bull for the first time in cooperation with offical association for sport invited national winners to London, UK

Red Bull Street Style - World final 2016

Red Bull for the first time in cooperation with offical association for sport invited national winners to London, UK
World Tour 2016 - Calgary
The best ranked athletes were invited to Calgary, Canada to compete for points to become ultimate world champion

World Tour 2016 - Calgary

The best ranked athletes were invited to Calgary, Canada to compete for points to become ultimate world champion
European Championship 2016
Copenhagen, Denmark hosted annual event for year 2016 to crown European champion.

European Championship 2016

Copenhagen, Denmark hosted annual event for year 2016 to crown European champion.
Super ball 2016
World open Freestyle Football championships for year 2016 was hosted by Liberec, Czech republic for the last time.

Super ball 2016

World open Freestyle Football championships for year 2016 was hosted by Liberec, Czech republic for the last time.
Asian Championship 2015
Annual event gathers the best freestyle football athletes to find Asian champion 2015 on Jakarta, Indonesia.

Asian Championship 2015

Annual event gathers the best freestyle football athletes to find Asian champion 2015 on Jakarta, Indonesia.
European Championship 2015
The best players from whole Europe came together to Amsterdam, The Netherlands, to fight for title of European champion.

European Championship 2015

The best players from whole Europe came together to Amsterdam, The Netherlands, to fight for title of European champion.
Super ball 2015
World open Freestyle Football championships for year 2015 happened again in czech city of Liberec at the end of summer.

Super ball 2015

World open Freestyle Football championships for year 2015 happened again in czech city of Liberec at the end of summer.
F3 World Tour 2014 - London
top 16 football freestylers showed in capital of United Kingdom what real ball control looks like.

F3 World Tour 2014 - London

top 16 football freestylers showed in capital of United Kingdom what real ball control looks like.
F3 World Tour 2014 - Beijing
1st stop of F3 World Tour showing top 16 players took place in capital of China, Asia.

F3 World Tour 2014 - Beijing

1st stop of F3 World Tour showing top 16 players took place in capital of China, Asia.
Super Ball 2014
World open Freestyle Football Championships 2014 held in Liberec, Czech republic.

Super Ball 2014

World open Freestyle Football Championships 2014 held in Liberec, Czech republic.
European Freestyle Football Championship 2014
2 star event where players from all around the Europe are battling for European champion title.

European Freestyle Football Championship 2014

2 star event where players from all around the Europe are battling for European champion title.
Freestyle Origins Season 2 - Ricardo Araujo (Brazil)
Freestyle Origins Season 2 - Tobias Busaet (Norway)
Freestyle Origins Season 2 - Jovanny Gonzalez (Mexico)
Freestyle Origins Season 2 - Gautier Fayolle (France)
Freestyle Origins Season 2 - Carlos Iacono (Argentina)
Freestyle Origins Season 2 - Lukasz Chwieduk (Poland)
Red Bull Street Style 2016 World final
Super Ball 2016
World Tour 2016 - Melbourne, Australia
Freestyle Origins Season 2 trailer
World Tour 2016 - Calgary
Freestyle Origins Season 1 - Esteban Acosta (Mexico)
Freestyle Origins Season 1 - Andrew Henderson (UK)
Freestyle Origins Season 1 - Philip Gertsson (Philippines)
Freestyle Origins Season 1 - Jhonny Peňa (Colombia)
Freestyle Origins Season 1 - Szymon Skalski (Poland)
Freestyle Origins Season 1 - Erlend Fagerli (Norway)
European Freestyle Football Championship 2016
North American Freestyle Football Championship 2015
Asian Freestyle Football Championship 2015
European Freestyle Football Championship 2015
Super ball 2015
Asian Freestyle Football Championship 2014
Football Freestylers take over the London
F3 World Tour 2014 - London
Super Ball 2014 - highlight
F3 World Tour 2014 - Beijing
European Freestyle Football Championship 2014 - highlight
F3WT 2014 - beijing highlight
Africa
Joel Asare -
Asia - Pacific
Aarish Ansari -
Europe
Lars Munck Petersen -
North America
Frankie Gonzalez -
South America
Martin Alvear Rodriguez -