Freestyle Football

Freestyle Football Association

The World Freestyle Football Association

World governing body of Freestyle Football and its structure

All you need is a ball

The World Freestyle Football Association is world governing body for the sport of freestyle football. It is committed to growing awareness of and participation in freestyle football worldwide.

Anyone can get into freestyle football – all you need is a ball! It is the art and sport of juggling a football using all parts of the body to entertain audiences and outperform opponents in competitions. It is a fusion of tricks with a ball, dance and music.

The Association owns the World Freestyle Football Championships and have created a rankings system and support structure that allows anyone to pick up a ball and not only enjoy the sport, but also develop their own pathway to becoming a professional.

The Association has been established upon a backbone of community development and education. This means we recognise the power this exciting sport has to inspire healthy active lifestyles for young people all over the world. Aside from growing the sport as a full time profession for the athletes, the Association is committed to teaching key life skills, nutrition and academics through freestyle football. 

Clinics

There are 106 country members in the network, which means a registered group of people and organisations in 106 countries of the world are committed to growing freestyle football as a sport in its own right and to delivering the social opportunity through the sport too.

Whilst there are just over 10,000 freestyle football athletes in the world right now, the total number of people who participate and enjoy freestyle football can be paralleled to mainstream football, because everyone who plays football will juggle with the ball at some stage and this forms the foundation of freestyle. Therefore one could suggest that participation is estimated at over 400 million, with a direct audience of 1.47 billion football fans around the globe who enjoy the entertainment of freestyle football.

Freestyle Football is however a completely different discipline to football (soccer) when you get really into the sport. It is about pushing the body to extreme limits, allowing creativity to flow and owning the ball in your own unique way.

Training freestyle football can dramatically build core fundamental skills that are useful in all aspects of life and across other sport disciplines. These include body awareness, balance, rhythm, control, touch, co-ordination and more intrinsic benefits such as self-confidence, respect, patience and taking responsibility.

Freestyle Football has something for everyone. It is a sport that allows males and females equal rights and that absolutely anyone can enjoy from whatever environment they find themselves in. The World Freestyle Football Association was created to make sure everyone gets the chance to be recognized as part of a community.

The World Freestyle Football Association is a non-profit organisation registered in Canada (Company number 1041184-1).

the Sport

Freestyle Football and its history

Football Freestyle is the art of doing tricks with a football. However if you scratch the surface you'll soon discover that it's more than just tricks. For freestylers today it's an art form, a sport and a lifestyle. It's difficult to pin point the exact moment in time where freestyle truly began.

Over 2000 years ago games such as Chinlone, Jianzi and Sepak Takraw in Southern and South East Asia all embraced many skills that relate directly to the art and sport as we know it today, but where freestyle football really began to form was in the 20th century. When you think about fundamental freestyle tricks such as the 'Neck Stall' and 'Around The World’; These were first performed in the 1800’s by circus performers such as Enrico Rastelli and Francis Brunn. If you watch videos of their performances today you can see many similarities to every modern day freestyler.

Despite the tricks, this was not 'freestyle football' - it was juggling. It wasn't until the 1980’s that freestyle became strongly associated to football. Diego Maradona, probably the best footballer in the world at that time, was the first person to perform these fundamental moves on a global stage and this pushed football freestyle into existence. Mr Woo and Kang Sung Min, two South Korean freestylers, would train with a football for up to 8 hours a day developing this new found art form. Later it was Mr Woo who carried freestyle football through the nineties virtually alone, showcasing new tricks such as sole juggling to audiences all over the world.

Even then, freestyle football was considered a novelty and only practiced by a handful of people across the globe. For freestyle football to develop it needed another push. At the beginning of the new millennium several significant events helped propel freestyle football into a new era, giving it an identity for the first time. Brazilian football icon Ronaldinho starred in Nike commercials, alongside Mr Woo, which glamorised freestyle. Soufiane Touzani, from the Netherlands introduced a new style of lower tricks and thanks to the internet and the fast developing mobile industry these videos travelled like wild fire. Suddenly everybody knew what freestyle football was. This inspired millions and freestyle football as we know it began.

Now globally known as freestyle football, a sport was born. Freestylers began to realise that there were no rules and no limitations. Different styles were developed such as; lowers, uppers, sitdowns, grounds and blocking. Because of the huge influx of newcomers to the sport, there was a sudden urgency to leave your own mark on the culture, meaning that the difficulty and level quickly rose. The next step for freestyle football to continue evolving and developing was to host live competitions. Battling one on one for national, continental and world titles would give freestylers a new sense of meaning to their daily training. The first major competition of this kind was Red Bull Street Style in 2008, which was hosted in Sao Paolo, Brazil. Sean Garnier won this competition with a style and look that hadn’t been seen in the public eye before. All of this meant that freestyle football was becoming a sport in its own right. 

 

The World Freestyle Football Association was established by leading freestylers and personnel from within the scene to develop support and structure for this exciting culture and sport.

Super Ball; the first 'open' world championship, where anybody can compete opened up the competitive side of the sport to new possibilities. It created competitions within the event, which would cater for freestylers with ranging styles, recognising that there is not just one true way to judge a freestyler. It was and is a competition for freestylers, by freestylers. Super Ball is now an annual event hosted in the Czech Republic and has become somewhat of an annual pilgrimage for freestylers from all corners of the world to come together and celebrate the culture and progress of freestyle football.

In 2015, legendary footballer and icon for freestyle football Ronaldinho was recognised by the World Association as ambassador for the sport.

Today competitions are organised across all habitable contents and videos are being shared by millions of people on a monthly basis.

Rules

Events / Competitions / Judges

 

2019 Official Rules of Freestyle Football Competitions

Produced by Freestyle Football Federation. Released 7th January 2014. Updated 14th November 2017, 18th November 2018

Member Subassociations:
EFFA - European Freestyle Football Association
NAFFA - North American Freestyle Football Association
SAFFA - South American Freestyle Football Association 
APFFA - Asia - Pacific Freestyle Football Association
AFFA - African Freestyle Football Association

This document outlines the core components and official rules of freestyle football competitions that are acknowledged by the World Freestyle Football Association (WFFA).

 This is to be seen as the minimum requirements for any event worldwide, although they can be altered to suit the needs of non‐official events (events in which no world rankings points are available) if appropriate.

 As world body for freestyle football development, WFFA have created criteria for a globally recognized judging structure and format. This is developed with input from freestylers across the globe to ensure accuracy.

 All official national and international events in the WFFA network must adhere to these criteria and it is expected that anyone else organizing freestyle football events will incorporate this system to ensure satisfaction from all participants.

WFFA has educated a team of official judges that can be offered to any event anywhere if required. They are experienced individuals who have worked with the sport of freestyle football extensively as athletes and officials. It is understood by WFFA that any judge of any freestyle football event must be actively involved in the sport of freestyle. Judges don’t always have to be active freestylers, as long as they can accurately assess the sport and understand all the criteria below well (see point 2.1.4)

 

Contents
  1. World Ranking
    1. Entry details
    2. Event Weighting
    3. Points
  2. Rules and Regulations
    1. Qualification Stage
      1. Qualification with up to 20 players
      2. Qualification with more than 20 players
    2. Knockout stage
      1. General
      2. Footballs
      3. Usage of hands
      4. Judges
      5. Timing
      6. Graphical demonstration of battle
  3. Additional regulations
    1. Protesting
    2. Disrespecting opponents
    3. Penalty
      1. Reporting
      2. Process
      3. Conclusion
  4. Judging criteria
    1. General
    2. Detail

  1. 1.0. World Ranking

    1.1. Entry details

    • The season for these events runs from 1st January to 31st December each year
    • WFFA recognized events must be open for anyone to enter in the first round
    • To have the right to gain points and participate in National (1-star) events, freestylers must identify themselves with their corresponding passport or ID card. Freestylers not living in their country of birth or with duel nationalities must choose whether they will represent their country of birth or another (in which they must have a valid residence permit/passport for).
    • To have the right to gain points and participate in a continental (2-star) event, freestylers must identify themselves with their corresponding passport or ID card. Freestylers can only participate in the Continental championship that corresponds with the 1-star event that they have already chosen to represent
    • Exceptions of this rule are taken into consideration only in unique cases of change location of athletes’ residency in certain country. WFFA must be aware of the situation and will approve/deny the request.
    • Freestylers cannot enter an event in a country or continent which they have not nominated for
    • Player with dual nationalities are not allowed to change their country of allegiance during more than once in lifetime. Only unique cases will be taken into consideration and discussed on annual committee meeting.

    1.2. Event Weighting
    1. Athlete can only gather points for world ranking from maximum of 3 events in a year

      • 1 x 1 Star Event – National Championship
      • 1 x 2 Star Event – Continental Championship
      • 1 x 3 Star Event – World Open Championship

      WFFA recognizes that some countries have larger number of participants and standard of freestyler. To compensate this an Event Weighting system is be introduced on Area Level tier system. This system allows the best athletes to be recognized at any circumstances.

      Area Level = how strong is local scene represented compared to the world according to different strength factors (except world open championship). Tiers are created by Sub-committee members and respected members of community.

      Strength factors within areas:

      • Number of world class athletes
      • Number of world and continental participants
      • Number of world and continental champions
      • Number of athletes in country
      • Number of participants on national championship
      • Event history

      Area Level tiers examples

      Tier

      National

      Continental

      G-6

      Poland, Mexico, Colombia, Brazil, Russia, Japan

       

      Strong

      Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Ukraine, UK, China, India, Indonesia, Iran, Turkey, UAE, Vietnam, Australia, Chile, Morocco, USA

      Europe, South America, Asia - Pacific

      Medium

      Argentina, Austria, Belarus, Belgium, Bolivia, Canada, Croatia, Czech republic, Egypt, Ghana, Greece, Ireland, Kazakhstan, KSA, Malaysia, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Singapore, South Africa, South Korea, Switzerland, Thailand, Uruguay

      North America, Africa

      Low

      Algeria, Brunei, Afghanistan, Guatemala, Kenya, Serbia, Ecuador, Slovakia, Portugal, Kuwait…

       

      1.3. Points

      National

      Tier

      Winner

      Runner up

      3rd place

      4th place

      Quarter

      Top 16

      Elimination

      Entry

      G-6

      125

      75

      55

      45

      25

      10

      5

      1

      Strong

      115

      70

      50

      40

      25

      10

      5

      1

      Medium

      100

      60

      45

      35

      15

      6

      3

      1

      Low

      90

      50

      35

      30

      10

      4

      2

      1

       

      International Open

      Winner

      Runner up

      3rd place

      4th place

      Quarter

      Top 16

      Top 32

      Elimination

      Entry

      200

      115

      75

      70

      35

      15

      8

      5

      1

       

      Continental

      Tier

      Winner

      Runner up

      3rd place

      4th place

      Quarter

      Top 16

      Elimination

      Entry

      Strong

      250

      150

      110

      90

      45

      25

      10

      1

      Medium

      210

      115

      75

      70

      35

      15

      8

      1

                       

       

    2. World Open

      Winner

      Runner up

      3rd place

      4th place

      Quarter

      Top 16

      Top 32

      Elimination

      Entry

      500

      300

      210

      180

      90

      45

      20

      10

      1

       

  2. 2.0.  Rules and Regulations

    1. 2.1.  Qualification Stage

      The stage is designed to qualify the strongest participants for the final round. It is really important to do this properly to avoid unhappy athletes and ensure all runs on time.

      • For official WFFA National Events (1-star) there must be minimum of 8 participants registered.
      • For official WFFA Continental Event (2-star) there must be minimum of 16 participants registered
      • If your event looks like having less competitors than the minimum it can still be classed as an official event but points will be weighted lower.

      Each competition will have different numbers of participants, so WFFA have identified the two following options that must be used at qualification stage:

      • 1 minute Performance (up to 20 participants)
      • Battle Circles (more than 20 participants)

      2.1.1. Qualification with less than 20 participants

      • Each participant must make a 1 minute performance.
      • To determine the starting order of the freestylers for this round there is a general seeding of players (this could be based on WFFA world rankings or results from previous championships for example). If no previous event has previously happened then names will be drawn out of a hat.
      • Athletes perform in order from last to first in accordance with the seeding.
      • There must be at least a top 8 for the 1-star events and a top 16 for 2-star events.
      • Judges rank participants in order from the best to the worst performance (see point 2.2.4 for judging criteria).
      • To give maximum opportunity in some countries for new freestylers to develop and learn, it could be managed so the top 12 from National rankings go through automatically and then for the final 4 places in the top 16 for battles, a qualification round can be made.
      • Final top 16 order is made (see point 2.2.6 for exact order).
      • In case there are exactly 16 participants, the qualification will determine only the order of athletes from 1st to 16th place.
      • Qualification could be modified for top 32 battles or top 8 battles in the final stage. It all depends on time management of the event and the organisers.
      • The same rules as knockout stage apply (see point 2.2.).

      1. 2.1.2. Qualification with more than 20 participants

        • To determine the starting order of the freestylers for this round there is a general seeding of athletes (could be based on the WFFA world rankings or results from previous championships).
        • There are 4 groups of athletes created based on the seeding.
        • Every athlete is in a group of four meaning they all have three opponents to compete against.
        • All players are in a circle and battling each other.
        • The number of circles depends on the number of athletes registered to compete.
        • Every athlete has three rounds, which last 30 seconds each.
        • Athletes each take their turn in the center of the circle.
        • After each round, the athlete should move from the center spot quickly back to their corner to make room for the next athlete.
        • The two best athletes from every circle goes through to the next round (could be more or less depending on the number of circles).
        • Those two winning athletes are announced straight after each circle battle by the head judge after a short general discussion between the judges.
        • The same rules as knockout stage apply (see point 2.2.1).
    2. 2.2. Knockout Stage 

      1. 2.2.1. General

        • Participants can use their own ball (see point 2.2)
        • Hands are NOT allowed (see point 2.3)
        • Judges will be picking the winner on overall performance (see point 2.4)
        • Foreign objects cannot be integrated into the battles (E.g. bottles, rope etc.)
        • Participants must not leave the stage at any time during the battle
        • No other people are allowed to be brought into battle
        • Dropped ball after trick attempt is not considered as anything else than drop
        • Any action after the time limit does not count into the performance, however if the ball is dropped it is considered as mistake
        • No outside interference in holding the ball to body (E.g. glue, tape, laces etc.)
        • Whilst one participant is performing, the opponent must not perform any moves or infringe upon their show
        • Changing equipment (shoes, ball) is not allowed during battle
        • Impersonating of the opponent is allowed, but disrespecting is strictly forbidden. There is a very fine line here and collectively the judges shall decide if anyone is acting inappropriately (See point2)
      2. 2.2.2. Footballs

        • Every freestyler is allowed to use his or her own football.
        • WFFA recognises that ball of size 5 is preferable choice. Nevertheless there is tolerance of 0,5 both ways (4.5 and 5.5).
        • It is strictly prohibited to use more than one ball in battle.
        • Surface of the ball and tricks performed with it are considered by judges
        • No modification to ball is allowed.
        • In case there is official ball of tournament requested to be used by all players on stage organization is obliged to send this ball to every participant at least 1 month before so he can get used to it. This exception must be approved by WFFA and communicated to athletes in advance.
      3. 2.2.3. The use of hands
        • It is forbidden to touch the ball with hands in battle with no exception
        • Every use of hand is considered as mistake
        • By hand understand “from shoulder to end of fingers
      4. 2.2.4 Judges and Judging

        • There must be odd number of judges (minimum of 3 and a maximum of 5).
        • All must be associated with freestyle football and active in the scene for more than 4 years and approved by WFFA expert in first stage of organization. WFFA will make suggestions if the judges are felt to be inappropriate.
        • Judges need to be perfectly aware of what they are asked to do and briefed properly following judging criteria.
        • Head judge is responsible for the whole panel regarding timing, distribution of sheets and proper briefing. He is the middle man of event director towards the judging panel.
        • All judges are given judging sheets and blank papers with pen so they can make notes. They are obliged to focus 100% on happening on stage.
        • After every battle judges are given at least 40 seconds to decide about result of battle. If judge is not ready he needs to give clear signal to host to not require the results yet.
        • When the decision is made, each judge should hold the card of winner in his hands and look directly to stage so host can see, judges are ready for announcement. In case of name cards are not present judges look to stage.
        • As soon as host requires, judges show their decision.
        • In case of final battle, each judge writes the name of his winner to piece of paper and hands it to Head judge. Head judge needs to write the name down as well before revealing the results from other judges. Then Head judge reveals the results and shows it to other judges so everyone is aware of final decision. Head judge then walks to stage, grabs finalists by hand, builds the suspension and on signal from host rises hand of the winner.
        • Judges should all have a short explanation detailing why they made the decision they have at the time they announce the winner of a battl In case they are asked, they must be able to defend their decision.
        • Judges decision is final and cannot be changed.
        • Judges are strictly not allowed to talk at any time between start of battle and announcement of result of the same battle.
        • Judge is not allowed to use so called "blank vote" in case he is not sure with result. There must be a decision.
        1. 2.2.5. Timing

          • Each battle lasts 3 minutes
          • Athletes take turns every 30 seconds which means both athletes will have the ball 3 times during every battle
          • Athlete is announced by host (or sound system) that his round is ending at least 5 seconds in advance.
          • There are additional 5 seconds between single rounds for athlete to finish his round and free the space to his opponent.
          • If athlete ends his round earlier opponent has advantage of using this time in his round.
          • In case of athlete having longer round opponent has right to take time, which has been stolen from him, from player’s next round (is announced by host)
        2. 2.2.6. Graphical demonstration of the battle schedule 

        3.  

          Graphical battle sheet

  3. 3.0.  Additional regulations

    1. 3.1.  Protesting

      • If there are any complaints or protests during the tournament, make sure you notify the tournament director straight after the event.
      • If anyone is unclear about the rules, then any questions should be raised before the event begins. No complaints concerning rules will be considered once the event has started.
      • The judges should never be approached at any time throughout the duration of the event. Their decision is final and all participants should respect that. Anyway every participant has right decision which influenced his performance to be explained.
    2. 3.2. Disrespecting opponents 

      • Within the format of the battles, successful performers will react to the situation, the music being played by the DJ and to the skills presented by their opponent.
      • At times there may be a fine line between impersonating the opponent and their moves and offending them in the heat of a battle.
      • With the nature of any freestyle football event now, content will be produced for TV, Mobile and Internet usage almost instantly if not broadcasted live anyway. Therefore with WFFA promoting Freestyle Football around the world as a healthy lifestyle choice for young people and pushing the athletes as role models for others, it is essential that the sport is perceived correctly.
      • If the judges feel that any participant acts with any form of major disrespect to their opponents or judges themselves, host of the event may (after consulting the judges) highlights this by way of a warning to the participant. If he continues, then judges have the right to stop the battle and eliminate the athlete.
      • Forms of disrespect could take the form of (but not be limited to) racism, negative references to opponent’s family members of upbringing, general bullying and references to alcohol or drug abuse.
    3. 3.3. Penalty 

      General Penalty Committee is formed in each continent sustaining from sub-committee members. Matters of this committee is part of continental committee meeting once every second month.

      3.3.1    Reporting

      • Violation of rules could be reported by anyone present or not present at the event where violation was spotted
      • Violation against rules needs to be presented to Head judge. He then delivers the message to Event director. Event director reports to sub-committee member of his region and he then presents it as part of agenda for meeting
      • Violation of rules needs to be provided with clear evidence. Assumptions are not considered as valid subject
      • If the violation is spotted immediately, person who is involved is left with one warning. If the violation should repeat, person could be disqualified
      • Reporter is responsible for punishment proposal

      3.3.2    Process

      • Only serious violations and violation which is not spotted personally are worth reporting it to General Penalty Committee.
      • General Penalty Committee has the right to not take unimportant violation into consideration. This needs to be announced to reporter.
      • Violator must be aware of the process and has the chance to offer defence. Defence could be in form of acceptance and apology. This is taken into consideration in process of measuring punishment.
      • The case is discussed with considering both punishment proposal from reporter and defence from violator. It could but does not have to be decision making factor
      • After discussion and review of rules meeting leader propose the conclusion. All members must vote including meeting leader himself
      • General Penalty Committee meeting report is constructed with conclusion

      3.3.3    Conclusion

      • Result of meeting with all details is presented to both Violator and Reporter
      • Both have right to request second calling with serious reasoning only
      • Second calling could but does not have to happen depending on members of General Penalty Committee
      • After conclusion is accepted, it is announced publicly online and archived
  4. 4.0.  Judging criteria

  5. 4.1. General

    • The five main criteria are difficulty, allround, originality, executionand control. They are all equally weighted. Each criterion includes sub-criteria, which the judges are obliged to take into consideration.
    • In the optimal case of having five judges, each judge will have one criteria each to judge. This way each judge can focus on only one criteria throughout the whole battle and then be able to make a very educated decision. When there are three judges, there will be one judge for difficulty and allround, one judge for execution and control, andonejudge for originality.
    • The judges will be giving points from 0-5 to each player in a particular criterion. The winner is determined by the player who gets the most amount of points on the scoreboard when all the points are summed up.
    • If the players get equal amount of points, the player who won the most criteria wins the battle. If it is still a tie, there will be an extra round each. The extra round will be judged the same way as a normal battle, but with 30 seconds for each battler.

    The guidelines for giving scores:

    • 5 – Excellent
    • 4 – Very good
    • 3 – Good
    • 2 – Fair
    • 1 – Poor
    • 0 – Absolutely failed

       

      It is also possible to give 0.5, 1.5, 2.5, 3.5 or 4.5 points if you mean that the performance for a player was somewhere between the scores mentioned above.The point-giving must be given based on the main criteria and the sub-criteria. The criteria and sub-criteria are:
  6.  
    • Difficulty (Technical difficulty of the tricks and combinations, as well as response)
  7. Overall performance – how difficult his full performance generally is
    Response in moves– a clear response to your opponent's tricks, style or concepts
    • Allround (general ability to perform all parts of sport the best way possible)
    The sum of the general level in Uppers, Lowers, Sitdowns, Transitions, Acrobaticsand Ground moves
    • Originality (Performing with individual style, creativity and variety)
    Original style – original composition of tricks, unique execution of moves
    Original moves – new, unusual, unexpected tricks
    Variety in general – ability to not repeat tricks or always tricks of the same kind in competition and over competitions
  8. Variety within battle – ability to not repeat tricks within the battle
    • Execution (the style performance with ball is executed)
    Cleanness – clean execution of tricks
  9. Flow – ability to move the ball around body without hesitation
  10. Style – how good looking the tricks are being performed
  11. Dynamics – strength and speed of movements
    Musicality – hitting the beat or clearly shows that he is following the music
    Battle attitude – showing your confidence and/or attitude. Attitude is about creating battle vibe and adding value to performance, done with respect
    • Control (the way the whole performance with ball is controlled)
    Control – general control of the ball on stage
  12. Mistakes – dropping the ball or creating mistake

    Note: Freestyle battle is not a routine. Every judge has in mind that a battle is also about adjusting to the opponent, having freedom in your sets and keeping the artistic part of freestyle.

  1. 4.2. Detail

This section goes more in depth in each criterion. It contains detailed explanation of every criteria and its sub-criteria as well as how every criteria relates to every other criteria.

 

4. 2. 1.          Difficulty («how difficult is a freestylers full performance, including response in moves»)

Difficulty is described by these sub-criteria:

How difficult in general it is for an average person to do his full performance. This is the most important sub-criterion in the difficulty criterion.

A freestyler can respond to various aspects in a battle, such as:

Considering how good an athlete does in response in a battle is, there are four considerations:

It is important that it is clearto the judge that he respondedto his opponent.

How Difficulty relates to every other criteria

Allround

In allround you sum up the general level of an athlete in every sub-criteria (Uppers, Lowers, Sitdowns, Transitions and Acrobatics). This means that it is very smart for the athletes to master every style in freestyle football the best way possible.

The difficulty judge however, looks at how difficult in general an athletes level is. In this criterion the judge are able to give more credibility to athletes that are very specialized in some styles.

For example, a freestyler showing excellent lowers, poor uppers and poor sitdowns could get a high score in difficulty, but lower score in allround. And a freestyler who does good uppers, lowers and sitdowns could get a good score in allround, but lower score in difficulty.

Originality

When you as a difficulty judge see an original move, you should only think of how difficultit most likely is for an average person todothat trick. You do not give points for the difficulty of creating that trick or the originality. The same goes with variety. You are only considering the trick or performance itself and how difficult that is to do.

It is therefore wrong as a difficulty-judge to give points for an original trick because it is hard to create new tricks, since the athlete should get enough points from the originality judge for this.

Execution

Considering style, cleanness, flow, dynamics: A difficulty judge only takes the difficultyof doing a trick for example clean compared to not clean. The difference between clean and not clean does not necessarily have to be that big in difficulty (for example an unclean PATW against a very clean patw). This means that as a difficulty judge you only take this small difference into consideration, whereas the execution judge will take this very much into consideration. The same goes for musicality and battle attitude, i.e. how difficult is it to include musicality and battle attitude into the performance.

Control

Almost no focus on the control or the mistakes. The difficulty judge should have focus on what the player manages to do and the difficulty of this. It is of course difficult to be consistent and don´t do drops, but this will be enough taken care of by the control-judge. Remember however that if a player drops a lot of times, he won´t be able to do very many difficult moves, thus a very bad control will affect the difficulty score as well. You should also consider how difficult it is to be able to do a hard trick/performance with a certain degree of control.

 

4. 2. 2.         Allround («what is the sum of your level in the five parts of allround»)

 Allround is the general ability to perform all parts of freestyle football the best way possible. It is the sum of the general level in every style, that is to be considered.

There are generally five parts of allround, which are: Uppers, Lowers, Sitdowns, Transitions and Acrobatics,and Ground moves (not required).

The fundamental categories of allround in freestyle football are:

Lowers: consists of tricks with your feet while standing

Note: Both parts do not have to be shown to fulfil the allround-criterion.

Uppers: tricks with your upper body

Note: Both parts do not have to be shown to fulfil the allround-criterion.

Sitdowns: tricks while sitting down

Note: There are a lot of different variations within sitdowns, but you do not have to show every part to fulfil the allround criterion.

Transitions: moves from one basic category to another

Note: You do not have to show transitions from every basic aspect to another to fulfil the allround criterion.

Acrobatics: handstand, backflip or other moves including acrobatic moves

Note: To get recognition for an acrobatic move, it must involve a move with the ball. For example, to lock the ball between your feet and do a backflip will not be rewarded so much, but a backflip catch is well rewarded. You do not have to show more than one well executed acrobatic move to fulfil the allround criterion.

Ground moves: moves with the ball on the ground

Note: Ground moves is not required to fulfil the allround criterion but can be rewarded as a bonus.

How Allround relates to every other criteria

Difficulty

In allround you basically sum up an athletes allround ability, meaning that he takes an athletes level of difficulty in every sub-criterion into consideration and sum it up. The relationship to difficulty is explained more in detail at “How Difficulty relates to every other criteria: Allround”.

Originality

You do not give credibility for people that are having an original style or doing original moves. this is being taken care of in the originality criterion. However, the amount of variety within competition and battle will automatically sort of be taken into consideration in the allround criterion since allround ability is about showing a variety of different tricks in different styles.

Execution

An allround judge should not take an athletes execution too much into consideration, because that is the job done by the execution judge. For example if a freestyler does very unclean sitdowns, the difficulty judge should give the amount of minus points he deserves for the difference in difficulty from doing clean sitdowns. It may be more difficult to do cleaner sitdowns however, and that is what the difficulty judge should consider. So if the sitdowns are very unclean, that athlete will generally get enough punishment through the execution-criterion. For the allround judge the same applies: If an athlete masters every sub-criterion very well but has bad execution, this should ideally only be punished by the difference in difficulty between doing it with good and bad execution. The bad execution gets enough punished through the execution judge.

Control

As an allround judge you should not be taking control too much into consideration. The allround judge should focus on what the player manages to do and the allround ability of this. But it also depends on the battle: If an athlete can show that he has great allround skills, but drops the ball occasionally because he is taking bigger risks, that freestyler could still get many points in allround criterion, but less points in the control criterion. If however an athlete clearly drops the ball because of lack of allround skills, that will automatically give him less points in the allround criterion, as well as in the control criterion. Remember that if a player drops a lot of times, he will not be able to show that much allround skills, and it will therefore affect the allround score.

 

4. 2. 3.          Originality («how unique/original are your moves and how much variety does your performance have»)

Originality relates specifically to the artistic and creative approach to freestyle football.

There are different ways in which a football freestyler can be considered as original. The judges should be aware of them. Here are the two main ways a freestyler can be original:

An originality judge should have a wide vocabulary of the universal moves in every style so that they can best determine if a move is new, copied or has been improved.

Biting: Bitingis a universal term that relates to the complete copying of a move or style without improving it or making it different in any way. There are not penalties for biting, however, no merits or points are awarded in the originality criterion to the style or move in which is deemed as a bite.

Repeating:The originality judge must take into account repeating. If an athlete comes out with the same moves all the time without adding something new, then the value of the moves will decrease dramatically in the originality criterion.

How Originality relates to every other criteria

Difficulty

Difficulty is a very small part of the originality criterion, which should not be taken very much into consideration. How unique/different his style or trick is, is the most important. Even though a difficult, original move is worth more, this is not the focus point. A very easy technical, but very original trick is still very original, and the difficulty of the trick will be taken care of by the difficulty-judge.

Allround

If you are only original in one style, this will not give the same score as having the same amount of originality in every style. This is not the most important part, since it is almost impossible to be original in every basic aspect in every battle. How unique/different his style or trick is, is still the most important but it is appreciated if the player does something original / have a variation in more than one style.

Execution

The execution of your original move/style could make it more worth just like in difficulty, but this is not the focus point.

Control

Do not focus on thegeneralcontrol at all.But regarding a specific trick, it depends on the circumstances. If a freestyler clearly did an original move, but failed juggling afterwards –he will get rewarded for this trick, but not as much if he landed it perfectly. But if the originality judge can see the freestylers thought behind the trick, but he was nowhere near landing it, he will not be rewarded for it.

 

4. 2. 4.          Execution («how good is a freestylers’ style, cleanness, flow and dynamics of your performance?»)

Execution is about the way you do your tricks. The criterion is described by these sub-criteria: 

Performing tricks the way they ideally should be done. This means having clean revolutions around the ball and not skipping movements.

Going nice and effortless from trick to trick without pauses or making the ball stop.

A trick can be done with nice flow and clean revolutions, without making it necessarily look good. Style takes care of the aesthetics of the performance.

Bringing energy to the stage, using big parts of the stage and showing strength and speed on movements.

Note: it should be clear to the judges that it was his intention to follow the music or hit the beat 

Battle attitude is about confidence:

Being able to convey self confidence. Confidence can be displayed by characteristics such as:

Notes: Battle attitude should be done with respect and with the spirit of the sport. A freestyler does not have to show every sub-criterion to fulfil the execution criterion.  

How Execution relates to every other criteria

Difficulty

It is more difficult to execute a difficult trick cleanly, than it is to execute an easy trick cleanly. If you are not doing difficult tricks, it is not possible to get excellent execution. You must do difficult tricks and show good style to get good execution. You get points for doing easy tricks clean and with good flow and dynamic as well, but you can’t get top score without doing some difficult tricks. This means that difficulty does play a role for the execution judge, even though the focus lays on the execution itself.

Allround

It is of course a plus to have good execution in every style, but the focus should be on how the athletes’ execution is in general. The judge should focus on what the player does and its execution.

Originality

No focus on the originality.

Control

Generally, the execution judge should have his focus on the execution on the moves the freestylers manage to do. Not on the general control or mistakes an athlete shows. However, a mistake or loss of control could affect the amount of flow for example. So, control will automatically still have a small effect on the execution criterion, even though this is not the focus.

 

4. 2. 5.          Control (“mistakes and general control”)

Control-criterion is described through two sub-criteria:

Showing a surplus of control of the tricks being performed and making it look easy. This means not «running» after the ball or obviously not having a consistent control.

This has to do with the objective fact of failing a trick. Dropping the ball to the ground, using hands or failing a trick you obviously tried to do.

A big drop where the ball goes off the stage counts more than a small drop, but it should not be a significant difference in the control criterion. The big drop will also count for other criteria as well, since he loses time and will not be able to do as many difficult, original and/or allround moves.

How Control relates to every other criteria

Difficulty

It is more difficult to do difficult moves with solid control and no drops, rather than easy moves with solid control and no drops. This means that if you are not doing difficult tricks, it is not possible to get excellent control. You must do difficult tricks and show good control here to get good control. You get points for doing no drops and easy tricks solid as well, but especially good control if it is difficult as well. This means that difficulty does play a role for the control judge, even though the focus lays on the control and mistakes itself. If you show a very good general control, but also take many risks because you want to get difficulty, you can still win the control criterion with more drops than the other. As a judge it is also easy to see when an athlete does tricks with surplus of control, rather than barely managing to do it.

Allround

It is of course a plus to have good control in every style, but the focus should be on how an athletes control is in general.

Originality

No focus on the originality.

Execution

If it is clear that a freestyler had bad execution in order to save a trick and not drop the ball, the control judge should take this into consideration.

 

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Ranking

World ranking / How it works
World list - Top 400How it works
Ranking from previous years: 2014, 2015
#NameNicknameCountryPts.starstarstarstarstarstar
1Erlend FagerliErlendNorway865115250500
2Diego UrzuaDegoxChile38511525020
3Sebastian OrtizBoykaColombia375750300
4Hiroyuki KanekoHiro-KJapan325752500
5Brynjar FagerliBrynjarNorway2657015045
6Yo KatusyamaYoJapan255550200
7Jesse MarletJesseNetherlands2551258545
8Viktor OlofsonVLOSweden2501159045
9Nguyen Ngoc PhatPhatVietnam2251151100
10Yousef RiescoYorokEgypt2151001150
11Ahmadreza Allameh FalsafiAhmadrezaIran210115905
12Abdoul Titi KoneTitiIvory Coast21002100
13Philip Warren GertssonPWGPhilippines195015045
14Griffin BerridgeGriffinUnited Kingdom1901254520
15Kazane ShimazakiKazaneJapan18000180
16Felipe PobletePip3Chile180251505
17Michael MolinaChile180701100
18Abdullah EmadEmadSudan17590850
19Esteban Hernandez AcostaPanteraMexico16575090
20Luis ReyesPeru160609010
21Gunther CelliGuntherItaly160115450
22Jhonny PeňaColombia150125250
23Alvaro LopezAlvaroSpain145115255
24Alexander WessbergSanderFinland145115255
25Jose CaballeroIsraelBolivia145100450
26Ardhi AndryadiIndonesia140115250
27Robert GuzikGuzikPoland13504590
28Szymon SkalskiSzymoPoland135454545
29Vladislav KostuchenkoKVPBelarus1301001020
30Jannis GasserGermany130115105
31Máté HajagosHungary13012505
32Ebrahim RashidAtieSouth Africa12590350
33Luis Carlos VenancioPeru125100250
34Timur AlekseevAlekseevRussia12512500
35Ricardo Fabiano De AraújoRicardinhoBrazil12512500
36Jairo GonzálesMexico12512500
37Bartolmiej RakKalaputaPoland12512500
38Kosuke TakahashiJapan12512500
39Jonathan PaulJonathanFrance12111515
40Daniel MikolajekMikolajPoland12075045
41Simon Atli LarsenSimonDenmark12011505
42Ebubekir TasTasUSA12011505
43Tom KenttaTom KenttaAustralia12011505
44Anatoly YarmistyUkraine11511500
45Xu Bo PingBitianChina11511500
46Neeraj Kumal ChawlaNeerajIndia11511500
47Daniel PražákDanyCzech republic10610015
48Mart PoolMartNetherlands10575255
49Blessed EzeakabuduBlessedNigeria10590150
50Jaromir PoprawaJKRPoland100552520
51Conor ReynoldsIreland10090100
52Jin Suk ParkJinkunSouth Korea10010000
53Yassine AbderrahimItaly10010000
54Fahad al BraikiUAE10010000
55Maxi GalarzaMaxiArgentina10010000
56Zulhilmi ZuaswaZhilmiMalaysia10010000
57Mikhail PlischenkoAnyOneRussia9575020
58Lukasz ChwiedukLukiPoland900090
59Michal RycajMichrycPoland900090
60Jordan MeunierJordanFrance9070020
61Jeffry GarciaJeffCosta Rica909000
62Jamie BrunoMagnetCanada909000
63Faisal Al SheikhFaisalSaudi Arabia909000
64Priit LeppikPriitFinland8570105
65Luca ChiarvesioItaly787008
66Rowdy HeinenNetherlands75451020
67Sammy LeBrasseurSammyUSA757005
68Gregor RussellGregorUnited Kingdom757500
69Adam SzabadosHungary757500
70Christopher Arlit BachOGDenmark727011
71Ashley Floorise MkhizeFlooriseSouth Africa710701
72Ivan MeleshkoImelUkraine707000
73Javier Sanz AguilarJaviSpain707000
74Jakub NekudaN3kyCzech republic686035
75Kotaro TokudaTokuraJapan6545020
76Anton PavlinovPavlinoffRussia6545020
77Kirill BylinskyBattlestormBelarus656005
78Jonathan Amot OlsenOlsenNorway5501045
79Mátyás KvártaKvartamHungary555005
80Davide PisaniItaly555005
81Maarten van LuitNetherlands555005
82Ben NuttallNuttallUnited Kingdom555005
83Anto SanzAnto SanzSpain555005
84Lucas MoralesChile5510450
85Anatoliy YanchevRussia555500
86Jay HennickeJayAustralia530458
87Bruno LothNonoFrance515001
88Kunal RathiKunalIndia500455
89Tommy SagmoenNorway5035105
90Tamas HorvathThorHungary504505
91Adam KřížekAdamCzech republic504505
92Vadim KirilenkoVadosUkraine505000
93Stephen GrayUnited Kingdom474511
94Mohamed El KhayariSpain464015
95Osman RoaColombia450045
96Matthieu PierronFrance4525020
97Kim TaeheeKimSouth Korea450450
98Ehsan Mousavi Nejad KashafiEsimoIran450450
99Daichi TanabeDaichiJapan450450
100Richard Valencia MartinezDarledsPeru454500
101Pavel TsagelnikovpashaffBelarus454500
102Wassim RabiaMossFrance434030
103Korad DybaśKondzioPoland4010255
104Pawel KwitRonniePoland4010255
105Ivan BianchiItaly4025105
106Ruslan RylkouRenoBelarus403505
107Roman ShershenRemychUkraine404000
108Luca GalliItaly404000
109Petr ZachZachyCzech republic363510
110Hazem HaguiHazemTunisia350350
111Sipho BusakweSiphoSouth Africa350350
112Van Ael AbdarrahamanVan AelComoros350350
113Nicola BarnabáItaly332508
114Anton PopovTonyRussia332535
115Ruben PrietoRubenSpain312515
116Jordan MorrisonAustralia3001020
117MohammadSaeid HamidzadeLeosaeidIran300255
118Boris EmelianovBorisRussia302505
119Angel Rodriguez RosAngelSpain302505
120Juan Carlos TovarJuancarSpain302505
121Peter VidoHungary262501
122Swann RittosaSwannItaly262501
123Sergio SanchezSergioSpain2510105
124Stanislaw KościelnyStaniuPoland250250
125Arie ArdiansyahIndonesia250250
126Amir MovafaghAmirIran250250
127Ariff KarimLagendaMalaysia250250
128Nguyen Quang HieuVietnam250250
129Masaru SaitoFujiJapan250250
130Dawid ZiomekZiomalPoland252500
131Milán SzabóMilcsiHungary252500
132Alexander VoyevodaUkraine252500
133Giuseppe CardaropoliOmagItaly252500
134Sam GalloFrance252500
135Denys RomanenkoDeRoUkraine252500
136Joe AshworthUnited Kingdom252500
137Lars Munck PetersenMunckDenmark252500
138Bulat KhuzinBulatRussia252500
139Mateusz PrzenzakPoland252500
140Jak GregoryUnited Kingdom252500
141Brian MoralesFrance252500
142Dawid KoczurDakoPoland252500
143Zoltán LiptákLippiHungary252500
144Adrián NietoNitofsSpain252500
145Vlad NedelnyukFanUkraine252500
146Vlad ZadoroznyiUkraine252500
147Mo OmarMoUnited Kingdom252500
148Dmitriy ShvedShvedRussia252500
149Vlad ZygalioAtteUkraine252500
150Nicolas RiviereFrance252500
151Maciej LejaPoland252500
152Rebaz MohammedRebazUnited Kingdom252500
153Róbert KeresztesiNodikaHungary252500
154Ibuki YoshidaIbukiJapan200020
155Mohammad AkbariMohammadIran200020
156Adrian KrogsaeterNorway200020
157Izu YuriYuri KamalioJapan200020
158Dawid BiegunZeganPoland200020
159Konrad CiesiolkiewiczKonradPoland161015
160Michal HorvatHorvyCzech republic161510
161Frank van der WielenFrankNetherlands150105
162Mateusz OdrzygóźdźLotarPoland150105
163Sindre HerreSindreNorway150105
164Sondre AksnesNorway151005
165Marcel BodrogiCFMHungary151005
166Michal BrzezickiBrzezikPoland151005
167Ilya SosninSosninRussia151005
168Mael AuffretMaelFrance151005
169Emigdad MohammedEmigdadSudan150150
170Mohammad Gamal AboaklGameyEgypt150150
171Mayowa BababunmiMayowaNigeria150150
172Joel AsareGhana150150
173Cecil ChiilaCecilZambia150150
174Obanor McCarthyObanorNigeria150150
175Ayoub HaouasAyoubTunisia150150
176Nikolay StahovichBelarus151500
177Denis PopovichenkoBelarus151500
178Sergey ShmotsSergey-SteepBelarus151500
179Dušan KuchaříkDudisCzech republic151500
180Wilfried dos SantosWiwiFrance151500
181Jakub DubinaKuba DubinaCzech republic151500
182Karel StrnadKarlosCzech republic151500
183Lorenz Marius KlevensLMKHungary131030
184Xiaopeng WangXiaopengChina110101
185Filip LukojkoPoland110101
186Zsolt SzendiHungary111001
187Mariano OlinoItaly111001
188Alexei KuzminykhAlexeiRussia111001
189Johan TrambouzeFrance111010
190Tommaso Daigoro De BernardiDaigorItaly111010
191Alexander MelnikovRussia10505
192Takuro MachimuraJapan100100
193Nguyen Huy HoangVietnam100100
194Simon StrandahlSimonNorway100100
195Doan Ngoc NamVietnam100100
196Hoang Van HungVietnam100100
197Nakamura ShunyaJaga PotatoJapan100100
198Nguyen Hoang AnhVietnam100100
199Hazim AhmadZeemMalaysia100100
200Tran Van DangVietnam100100
201Muhammad Anas HashimAnasMalaysia100100
202Nguyen Chien ThangVietnam100100
203Ho Minh QuanVietnam100100
204Pongsatorn SungpliansangOhmThailand100100
205Vu Ngoc NamVietnam100100
206Nguyen Dao Anh KhoaVietnam100100
207Chris Bennet BrokerBrokerGermany100100
208Patryk MęcikPoland101000
209David CrespoSpain101000
210Josh SandersUnited Kingdom101000
211Jamie DavidsonUnited Kingdom101000
212Petrik BalázsHungary101000
213Danil AduviriUkraine101000
214Dmitriy RomanenkoDe_LiseRussia101000
215Amine AmanzouFrance101000
216Rachid AballahFrance101000
217Patrik LudányiHungary101000
218Bogdan ZavorotnyiAbdogdoUkraine101000
219Alejandro PortillaSpain101000
220Kamil RaczyRa3Poland101000
221Johnny ChapmanUnited Kingdom101000
222Vadim SkolobUkraine101000
223Nikita SivovRussia101000
224Joan SitjarSpain101000
225Dawid JarzebowskiJarzebośPoland101000
226Denis FomichevRussia101000
227Michal SiemaszkoPoland101000
228Alex CidUnited Kingdom101000
229Bódi GyörgyHungary101000
230Artem GrishaenkoUkraine101000
231Maxim ZherebtsovRussia101000
232Bruszt GyőzőHungary101000
233Antonio ColellaAntoItaly101000
234Matthieu BardeyFrance101000
235Lince IbericoSpain101000
236Alfie McNallyUnited Kingdom101000
237Stanislav TurevskiyUkraine101000
238Jose Luis BarrioSpain101000
239Sergey VasilievSerioRussia101000
240Amine BartolouSpain101000
241Hamza NabilHungary101000
242Logan RagouraminMowgliFrance101000
243Aleksandr MelnikovmolodoyRussia101000
244Ilya GusakGusUkraine101000
245Igor MakidonovMakrosUkraine101000
246Alvaro ObregonSpain101000
247Yuto AmagasaAmaJapan8008
248Daniel KowalDanielsonPoland8008
249Corvin BerntGermany8035
250Peter Magnus StensethPeter StensethNorway8035
251Francisco Alonso ValverdeLinceSpain8035
252Sarpong Kojo LuckyKojoGhana8080
253Benjamin DavidNigeria8080
254Chetuya EmmanuelNigeria8080
255Vincent MichaelNigeria8080
256Benjamin JohnNigeria8080
257Tony SolomonNigeria8080
258Chuckwuebuka EzughaNigeria8080
259Jude OjeoruNigeria8080
260Taiwo TheophilusNigeria8080
261James LovedayNigeria8080
262Austin AbariaboteNigeria8080
263Opoola AbiolaNigeria8080
264Jubril AbdulrasakNigeria8080
265Victor AkpanNigeria8080
266Christian MetuNigeria8080
267Ibrahim AdeoyeNigeria8080
268Samuel WellerSamuGermany6015
269Andrei AkritovAndrewUkraine6015
270Victor HerranzSpain6105
271Alexander ArshinArshinRussia6501
272Andrey MareckiyBelarus6600
273Sergey GordeychlikChinookBelarus6600
274Daniil LapshinovBelarus6600
275David LapshinovBelarus6600
276Jorge Capacoila CopaPeru6600
277Roman KazemiBelarus6600
278Gleb ShalaevBelarus6600
279Justin CantoCantoFrance5005
280Renaud MauleonRenaudFrance5005
281Aibolat KubashevKazachstan5005
282Nico GondraNicoArgentina5005
283Hugo VileseHugoNetherlands5005
284Gabor KerekesHungary5005
285Anton NikolaenokNikolaBelarus5005
286Alessandro ColazzoColiItaly5005
287Bohdi BosBohdiNetherlands5005
288Isaac HernandezIsaacMexico5005
289Antonio NoguezAntonioMexico5005
290Ke Long PengPengChina5005
291Alexandr TurlakovRussia5005
292Rodrigo Xavier VelazquezRodrigoArgentina5005
293Bruno BeloPortugal5005
294Shogo KanataCanataJapan5005
295Alan WolnickiAlanPoland5005
296Hermen VoerknechtHermenNetherlands5005
297Naif AlsahabiLocoNaifSaudi Arabia5005
298Aksel MutluMutluRussia5005
299Olle WallinderOlleSweden5005
300Shogo YurinoJapan5005
301Juan AguiloAguiloChile5005
302Piotr BujakBujakPoland5005
303Sigve Lamark MonsenSigveNorway5005
304Jonas JeppesenJonasDenmark5005
305Alexander MendozaAlexUSA5005
306Annas SebarAnnasMorocco5005
307Kosuke MuraiKosukeJapan5005
308Kasper JohansenKasperDenmark5005
309Riles OulebsirRilesFrance5005
310Piotr KielarPiotrPoland5005
311Evgenii ArkipovEVGRussia5005
312Miguel TeshibaMikeMexico5005
313Pascal LaschetAustria5005
314Yousef HawwariYusuPalestine5005
315Edvin BelinSweden5005
316Kohei KikkawaKoheiJapan5005
317Adalberto LopezBorgettiUSA5005
318Mads Fristed NavneFristedDenmark5005
319Dmitriy OsmekninDiplomatRussia5500
320Vladislav SmirnovRussia5500
321Emil AgzamovEmilienRussia5500
322Dorian Da SilvaFrance5500
323Vadim OrekhovOrexRussia5500
324Mathias Biran-France5500
325Rishat FaridonovRishatRussia5500
326Nikita AksininLil_NickRussia5500
327Bacem HaguiFrance5500
328Patrick BäurerGermany4031
329Dawid PajorHakerPoland4130
330Georg LingardJojjeSweden3030
331Quaresma Dos Santos WilfriedWiwiFrance3030
332Jakob Semajer GaricJokasDenmark3030
333Piotr ZiebaPoland2011
334Oscar RenekeOscarSweden2011
335Jannik SingpielJannikGermany2011
336Sebastian van der KaayBasNetherlands2011
337Viggo KraftSweden2011
338Angel MarquesMarquesSpain2101
339Edu BonillaEduSpain2101
340Robert BejdaRobikPoland2101
341Alvaro Diaz ZuritaZuritaSpain2101
342Keiron DhunganaNepal2101
343Ta Hong LongVietnam2020
344Ho Jia WeiSingapore2020
345Ameer YaseenAmeerMalaysia2020
346Pham Van LongVietnam2020
347Dao Tien DatVietnam2020
348Chunyin LaiHong Kong2020
349Bap Quang HieuVietnam2020
350Pang Kin FatHong Kong2020
351Marcin KucharczykPoland2110
352Anas El ArroudiSpain2110
353Adrian ZagorskiAdrianPoland1001
354Daiki HirataDaikiJapan1001
355Jushua TadrosJushuaGermany1001
356Ilari MustonenIlariFinland1001
357Nick SeydaUSA1001
358Fojciech WitkowskiPoland1001
359Lukas SilicSilicDenmark1001
360Bohdan ZavorotniiUkraine1001
361Puneet DhundeleIndia1001
362Ryo SatoRyoJapan1001
363Joachim CabraCabraFrance1001
364Nils EffinghausenGermany1001
365Milosz StopinskiStopaPoland1001
366Wai Ching MaHong Kong1001
367Akshay YadavAkshayIndia1001
368Archis PatilArchie CrispyIndia1001
369Dominik GacaGacaPoland1001
370Kabelo GillKabeloSouth Africa1001
371Dylan StipackAustralia1001
372Egor TelushkoEgorkoBelarus1001
373Arnold SarmientoPeru1001
374Bailey RegtBaileyNetherlands1001
375Pascal BeausencourtPascalGermany1001
376Pietro TesoroItaly1001
377Hugues SailandHuguesFrance1001
378Danil MekhonoshinDanilRussia1001
379Daniel KománekCzech republic1010
380Prince MaduNigeria1010
381Ngo Minh QuangVietnam1010
382Carl HelenelundCarlSweden1010
383Nicholas LeoniItaly1010
384Marcin SamsonPoland1010
385Sebastian LjungkvistDenmark1010
386Nijat SafarovAzerbaijan1010
387Michal NowackiPoland1010
388Kenneth IyoriobheNigeria1010
389Ngo Toan ThangVietnam1010
390Paul LuisGermany1010
391Hicham HamouchGermany1010
392Francois RozelFrance1010
393Matthias BoselSwitzerland1010
394Bolu PrinceNigeria1010
395Florian KaulenGermany1010
396Patrick RehbergerGermany1010
397Jané JahnertGermany1010
398Przemyslaw MistrzakMistrePoland1010
399Ricardo RehländerGermany1010
400Chidere ObiajumwaNigeria1010
This page is dedicated to providing you with the official freestyle events being organized around the world.
 
In 2012, WFFA members introduced a rankings system, that means by participating in certain events a freestyler can accumulate points, which will count towards their overall world ranking postition. Not every single event is included in this. The system is focused on a very basic model to ensure long term sustainability for the sport can be achieved and those winning championships are rewarded accordingly.

For anyone organizing an event, make sure you email info@thewffa.org to register it on the world freestyle calendar. WFFA is keen to support and promote all events in the sport/art of freestyle football, so even if your event cannot be classified to qualify for world ranking point, we could still help.

We encourage everyone to take part in as many events as possible (even non-WFFA accredited events) to gain experience. Online competiotions are not rewarded with points. The rankings system is in place to determine every year who ultimately the most successful freestyler around the world is. WFFA believes a true winner is somebody who has the ability to perform both the art and sport of freestyle football on a consistently world class level.

World Freestyle Football Rankings

All athletes with points gained from WFFA registered events are listed on the 'Ranking' page. The points are awarded based on success in regional and International events across all continents. Every December 31st the list will be updated to then determine who are the best athletes on the world for each year.
 
Participation in Events
 
Freestylers may only compete in one official national and continental event each year in order to build up their world ranking points. If someone has dual nationalities, they must:
A continental event is open for anyone who represents a country in that continent to enter (or in some instances at least the qualifiers for it are open for anyone). A world open event is open for anyone to enter!
 
There are many more events all over the world that we would encourage anyone to participate in to build experience and consistency in performance. As the sport grows further WFFA will look for ways to build more events into the points system.
 
World Communication Network
 
See section "Network" on this website to view a comprehensive list of all members of WFFA. In case of any issue from your region, you will find representative person who you should talk to. That person is then responsible to deliver this issue to WFFA representatives.
 

Partners

Our partners

 

Soccerex:

Soccerex

SuperBall:

SuperBall

SWRL:

SWRL

 

 

 

 



 

Women's League

Women's League

Participation in Freestyle Football for women is rapidly growing throughout the world, with more people developing themselves as professional full-time athletes.

Many people may believe freestyle football to be a new sport for women, however we can actually go back to the beginning of the 20thcentury to see how circus artist Trixie Larue already performing many of the tricks that we see in the sport today. Ronaldinha then released a series of videos online, which popularized the ambition for more women to perform tricks with a football.

 In the early 2000’s, the first ever professional female freestyler, Sandy Levitas from France, also known as ‘Bambi ball’, was breaking barriers and performing next to the pioneers of male freestyle such as Palle, Nam the Man, Abbas Farid and more.

This paved the way for many more girls to come into the sport including the likes of Kitti Szasz (Hungary), Melody Donchet (France), Kathy Vije (The Netherlands) and Laura Biondo (Venezuela), who were competing alongside the men. This is still allowed to this day, however the first women only freestyle competition was launched in 2011.

Today the WFFA wants to continue to build a sport with equal opportunities for all.

 

Female Freestyle Football Competitions

This document outlines the core components and official rules of female freestyle football competitions that are acknowledged by the World Freestyle Football Association (WFFA).

This is to be seen as the minimum requirements for any event worldwide, although they can be altered to suit the needs of non‐official events (events in which no world rankings points are available) if appropriate.

Contents

  1. World Ranking
    • 1.1.   Entry details
    • 1.2.   Event weighting
    • 1.3.   Points
  2. Women’s Freestyle League: Online
    • 2.1.   Rules
      • 2.1.1.   Part 1 Qualification
        • 2.1.1.1.   Video Requirements
        • 2.1.1.2.   Routine Considerations
      • 2.1.2.   Part 2 Online Battles
        • 2.1.2.1.   Battle Structure
      • 2.1.3.   Other Information
    • 2.2.   2019 Dates
    • 2.3.   Judges & Prizes
  3. Women’s Freestyle League: Live

 

 1.   World Ranking

1.1.   Entry details

- The season runs from 1st January to 31st December each year.
- WFFA recognized events must be open for anyone to enter in the first round.
- More than one girl from one same country can participate simultaneously in the same competition.
- There is no age restriction unless specifically stated in the entry requirements.

1.2.   Event Weighting

Athletes can gather World Ranking points from entering two tiers of events during the year. The number of events that apply and extra tiers will be increased in the years ahead.

1 Star Event – Online League

2 Star Event – World Open Live Events

1.3. Points

1-Star Events

Winner

Runner up

3rdPlace

4thPlace

Quarter

Top 16

Entry

200

115

75

70

35

15

5

2-Star Events

Winner

Runner up

3rdPlace

4thPlace

Quarter

Entry

250

150

110

90

45

10

 

2.   Women’s Freestyle League: Online

The WFFA Women’s Freestyle League is a series of competitions online, designed with the aim of increasing the participation and standard levels of female freestyle on a global basis, motivating all athletes to train and stay active within the scene.

The league consists of 2 or more online competitions per year where females battle each other to gain WFFA ranking points and special prizes.

 

2.1.   Rules

2.1.1. Part 1 Qualification; Routine

Players will send their non-edited 90-second freestyle routine video to laura@thewffa.org

The 16 best players will advance onto the second part — the online battles.

These videos will be ranked by 3 international professional freestylers appointed by the WFFA. Judges will consider the overall performance. 

2.1.1.1.   Video Requirements

  • Video must have a minimum duration of 85 seconds and a maximum of 110 seconds (action must be no longer than 90 seconds and no less than 80 seconds).
  • Video must be an individual freestyle routine with no editing.
  • In order to make sure that the video is a recent one, it must start with the freestyler saying the words "Hello, this is NAME from COUNTRY and this is my first Women’s League qualification video" to the camera or showing a paper/sign with the same details.
  • Routine should show a mix of sit-down, lower and upper moves.
  • Use of hands is forbidden.
  • Music is optional.
  • No graphics or special effects.
  • Single-perspective video.

 2.1.1.2.  Qualification Video Considerations

1.   Creativity / Variety
Competitors must show a strong level of comfort in all forms of the sport. The judges are looking for a CREATIVE combination of floor and standing tricks, as well as foot, head and body tricks: innovation and originality are critical to win this element of the game.

2.    Control / Execution
The quality of execution and overall control of the ball needs to be demonstrated throughout the videos to score maximum points. Use of hands and any mistakes are definitely not appreciated.    

3.     Technical Difficulty
Judges will be assessing the difficulty level of the tricks featured in the videos, based on their knowledge of how complex and unique they are.

4.     Style / Energy and Rhythm
Style is as valuable as creativity and control. A good style appears effortless and smooth. Natural connection with the background music is an element of style and so is something as simple as enjoying your tricks.

 

2.1.2.   Part 2 Online Battles

Based on their performance in the freestyle routines, 16 female athletes will be chosen to compete on the online battles.

Online battles work just like live ones: each player has three x 30-second rounds.

Player A will send her first 30 second round to player B. Player B will then reply by sending her 1st round of 30 seconds to player A. This continues until both players send their three rounds. After, all rounds are combined by the battle supervisor, the finished battle will be sent to the judges, who will then decide and announce the winner.

Online battles will be held through an email thread which will include the two freestylers in contention and a WFFA Women’s League battle supervisor who will make sure that players send their rounds on time.

2.1.2.1.   Battle Structure

There will be eight initial battles, which will be structured according to the ranking of the routine videos. For example, the freestyler who was ranked first will battle the one who ranked 16th, the one ranked 2nd will battle against the one ranked 15th, and so on.

The 8 winners will move on to quarter final battles that will happen in the same way.

The competition will continue then with semi-finals, battle for 3rdplace and the final all following the same online battle method described above.

 

2.1.3   Other information

Ball must be no smaller than size 4.5 and no larger than size 5. For more details contact a WFFA representative.

Only the first video per freestyler will be accepted. If videos don’t respect the rules in terms of duration, the format or the ball, then athlete will be automatically eliminated.

 

 2.2.   2019 Dates

1stWomen’s Online League

2ndWomen’s Online League

March 15 – May 31

October 1 – December 22 *

* There will be an interruption from November 8thuntil November 20thduring which RBSS live event will happen.
** From July 15 until August 16 the Online qualifiers for RBSS will be held with the same rules.

 

1st Women’s Online League

2nd Women’s Online League

-   Qualification videos must be sent by March 15.

-   Judges announcement of top 16 qualified for next stage will be on the March 25.

-   Online battles will proceed from March 28th until May 31st

 

-     Qualification videos must be sent by October 1st.

 

-     Judges announcement of top 16 qualified for next stage will be on the October 10.

 

-     Online battles will proceed from October 1st until December 22nd with a break in mid-November for RBSS live event. 

 

Top 16 battles

 

28th March player 2 set 1
30th March player 1 set 1
1st April player 2 set 2
3rd April player 1 set 2
5th April player 2 set 3

7th April player 1 set 3

 

Results top 16 battles will be announced on April 12

 

Top 16 battles

 

12th October player 2 set 1
14nd October player 1 set 1
16th October player 2 set 2
18th October player 1 set 2
20th October player 2 set 3

22nd October player 1 set 3

 

Results top 16 battles will be announced on October 27

 

Top 8 battles – Quarter Finals

 

14th April player 2 set 1
16th April player 1 set 1
18st April player 2 set 2
20th April player 1 set 2
22nd April player 2 set 3

24th April player 1 set 3

 

Results of top 8 battles will be announced on April 29

 

Top 8 battles – Quarter Finals

 

29th October player 2 set 1
31st October player 1 set 1
2nd November player 2 set 2
4th November player 1 set 2
6th November player 2 set 3

8th November player 1 set 3

 

Results of top 8 battles will be announced on November 13
*Break for RBSS live event

 

Top 4 battles – Semi Finals

 

1st May player 2 set 1
3rd May player 1 set 1
5th May player 2 set 2
7th May player 1 set 2
9th May player 2 set 3

11th May player 1 set 3

 

Results of top 8 battles will be announced on May 16

 

Top 4 battles – Semi Finals

 

20th November player 2 set 1
22nd November player 1 set 1
24th November player 2 set 2
26th November player 1 set 2
28th November player 2 set 3

30th November player 1 set 3

 

Results of top 8 battles will be announced on December 5

 

Final Battle & 3rdplace battle

 

18th May player 2 set 1
20th May player 1 set 1
22nd May player 2 set 2
24th May player 1 set 2
26th May player 2 set 3

28th May player 1 set 3

 

Final results will be announced on

May 31

 

Final Battle & 3rdplace battle

 

7th December player 2 set 1
9th December player 1 set 1
11th December player 2 set 2
13th December player 1 set 2
15th December player 2 set 3

17th December player 1 set 3

 

Final results will be announced on December 22

 

 2.3.   Judges & Prizes

Judges & Prizes for each Women’s League event will be announced through the WFFA social media channels closer to the dates of the competitions.

 

3.0. Women’s Freestyle League: Live

The same entry and judging criteria apply for both men and women at the live events. See event and rules pages for more information.



           

Top Athletes

General info

The Freestyle Football World Masters is a World Championship event visiting major cities around the world. The participants are the top 16 freestyle football athletes in world today, as determined by the World Rankings published by the World Freestyle Football Association at the end of each year. They are all competing throughout various challenges to ultimately win the title of Freestyle Football World Masters Champion.

Freestyle Football can be uniquely identified as a SpArt. It is a mixture of an ‘Art’, which involves performing choreographed routines to music with a football and a ‘Sport’ as athletes then compete head to head over 3-minute knockout battles with judges scoring them on Originality, Execution and Technical difficulty.

Event History

The World Freestyle Masters came out from the Freestyle Football World Tour which was created as a one off event in 2011 in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The events was won by the UK's Andrew Henderson.

Kuala Lumpur 1st event

In 2013 the World Tour was staged in 2 venues, London UK & Dubai, UAE. The year was dominated by Poland Michryc who won both events and the Overall World Tour Crown.

In 2014 World Tour was hosted in amazing city of Beijing, China and returned to London once more to famous O2 arena. Carlos Iacon from Argentina finished on second place each of the event but accumulating the most points overall he became a champion of World Tour 2014.

After one year break in 2015, World Tour has come back with 2016 edition starting in Calgary, Canada with first leg and finishing in Melbourne, Australia with incredible set up and PR acitivities. This year was dominated by unstoppable englishman Andrew Henderson.

In 2017 there has been another break and with 2018 the World Freestyle Masters was created to focus on one event per year only and make it unforgettable experience for every participant. Hosting the first official World Freestyle Masters event in Tokyo, Japan together with World Street Soccer Championship and DAZN as a title partner, WFFA believes in bright future of this event.

Hosting an Freestyle Football World Masters Event
If your city would like to host a Freestyle Football World Tour Event then applications are now currently open to host a 2018 and 2019 Event.

If you are interested in receiving a Host City Pack then please get in contact with us by emailing info@thewffa.org 

How to Qualify For the Freestyle Football World Masters

Freestylers anywhere in the world can earn points by competing in events that are recognised by the World Freestyle Football Association as either 1, 2 or 3-star competitions. These points are accumulated throughout each calendar year and go towards their position in the World Rankings. 1-Star events are national championships. 2-star events are continental opens and there is one 3-star event each year, which is Super Ball. There are many more competitions each year outside of the world ranking qualifiers, in which Freestylers can also be recognised for a chance to win one of the Wild Card spaces in the Freestyle Football World Masters.

Note: In event of a Freestyler qualifying twice (ie through Top 8 on 2013 Tour & Top 6 in World Rankings) then the spot is offered to following player in ranking.

Event Format & Rules

Beijing finalThe competition is held in well known battle format.  

Battles are 3 minutes long with each freestyler having 3 x 30 second rounds to outperform each other and impress the judges. At this stage, technical difficulty of the tricks and how each freestyler responds to their opponent are also critical factors for the judges to consider.

Freestylers have to abide by the Battle Rules which can be seen here

Judges are established freestylers who are held in high regard by the community and are knowledgeable on the rapidly progressing tricks within the sport.

There are 3 judges in each event who will decide instantly the result of each battle without consulting each other.

 

Top Athletes

Top 16 - Player profiles
Jesse Marlet
Jesse

Michal Rycaj
Michryc

Tobias Brandal Busaet
Tobias

Erlend Fagerli
Erlend

Gautier Jean-Marie André Fayolle
Gautier

Szymon Maciej Skalski
Szymo

Brynjar Fagerli
Brynjar

Lukasz Czeslaw Chwieduk
Luki

Sebastian Ortiz Hernandez
Boyka

Pedro Henrique de Oliveira Duarte
Pedrinho

Philip Warren Gertsson
PWG

Esteban Hernandez Acosta
El Pantera

Yo Katsuyama
Yo

Ricardo Chahini de Araujo
Ricardinho

Jordan Valentino Morisson
Jordan

Emil Källdoff
Källdoff



Ranking

Ranking / Top 16
NameNicknameCountryPts. stage 1Pts. stage 2Pts. stage 3Total pts.
Brynjar FagerliBrynjarNorway000---
Emil KälldoffKälldoffSweden000---
Erlend FagerliErlendNorway000---
Esteban Hernandez AcostaEl PanteraMexico000---
Gautier Jean-Marie André FayolleGautierFrance000---
Jesse MarletJesseNetherlands000---
Jordan Valentino MorissonJordanAustralia000---
Lukasz Czeslaw ChwiedukLukiPoland000---
Michal RycajMichrycPoland000---
Pedro Henrique de Oliveira DuartePedrinhoBrazil000---
Philip Warren GertssonPWGPhilippines000---
Ricardo Chahini de AraujoRicardinhoBrazil000---
Sebastian Ortiz HernandezBoykaColombia000---
Szymon Maciej SkalskiSzymoPoland000---
Tobias Brandal BusaetTobiasNorway000---
Yo KatsuyamaYoJapan000---
Events
2019 - July
July 2019
SundayMondayTuesdayWednesdayThursdayFridaySaturday
30th June
1st
2nd
3rd
4th
5th
6th
Nepal Freestyle Football Championship 2019
Kathmandu
6th
Belarussian freestyle football Championship
Minsk
7th
8th
9th
10th
11th
12th
13th
14th
15th
16th
17th
18th
19th
UAE Freestyle Football Championship
Dubai
19th
Campeonato Nacional Colombiano
Copacabana, Medellín, Antioquia.
20th
Red Bull Street Style - Perú 2019
MEGA PLAZA - LIMA
20th
21st
22nd
23rd
24th
25th
26th
Freestyle Soccer and Breaking 2019
San Salvador
27th
28th
The WFFA Finnish Championship
Helsinki
29th
30th
31st
1st August2nd August3rd August
Create request for event
Key
Super Ball 2018
Massive success of previous year brought this incredible event back to Prague to another iconic venue. Prague Metronome.

Super Ball 2018

Massive success of previous year brought this incredible event back to Prague to another iconic venue. Prague Metronome.
Super ball 2017
After 3 years in Liberec this massive event returned back to Prague to crown world champion 2017

Super ball 2017

After 3 years in Liberec this massive event returned back to Prague to crown world champion 2017
Freestyle Origins - Ricardo Araujo "Ricardinho" (Brazil)
Unique documentary about the best freestylers around the world.

Freestyle Origins - Ricardo Araujo "Ricardinho" (Brazil)

Unique documentary about the best freestylers around the world.
Freestyle Origins - Sebastian Ortiz "Boyka" (Colombia)
Unique documentary about the best freestylers around the world.

Freestyle Origins - Sebastian Ortiz "Boyka" (Colombia)

Unique documentary about the best freestylers around the world.
Freestyle Origins - Esteban Acosta (Mexico)
Unique documentary about the best freestylers around the world.

Freestyle Origins - Esteban Acosta (Mexico)

Unique documentary about the best freestylers around the world.
Freestyle Origins - Lukasz Chwieduk "Luki" (Poland)
Unique documentary about the best freestylers around the world.

Freestyle Origins - Lukasz Chwieduk "Luki" (Poland)

Unique documentary about the best freestylers around the world.
Freestyle Origins - Erlend Fagerli (Norway)
Unique documentary about the best freestylers around the world.

Freestyle Origins - Erlend Fagerli (Norway)

Unique documentary about the best freestylers around the world.
Freestyle Origins - Gauiter Fayolle (France)
Unique documentary about the best freestylers around the world.

Freestyle Origins - Gauiter Fayolle (France)

Unique documentary about the best freestylers around the world.
Freestyle Origins - Daniel Mikolajek "Mikolaj" (Poland)
Unique documentary about the best freestylers around the world.

Freestyle Origins - Daniel Mikolajek "Mikolaj" (Poland)

Unique documentary about the best freestylers around the world.
Freestyle Origins - Guillermo Vaz "M3mo" (Mexico)
Unique documentary about the best freestylers around the world.

Freestyle Origins - Guillermo Vaz "M3mo" (Mexico)

Unique documentary about the best freestylers around the world.
Freestyle Origins - Szymon Skalski "Szymo" (Poland)
Unique documentary about the best freestylers around the world.

Freestyle Origins - Szymon Skalski "Szymo" (Poland)

Unique documentary about the best freestylers around the world.
Freestyle Origins -Philip Warren Gertsson "PWG" (Philippines/Norway)
Unique documentary about the best freestylers around the world.

Freestyle Origins -Philip Warren Gertsson "PWG" (Philippines/Norway)

Unique documentary about the best freestylers around the world.
Freestyle Origins -Jovanny Gonzalez "Gio" (Mexico)
Unique documentary about the best freestylers around the world.

Freestyle Origins -Jovanny Gonzalez "Gio" (Mexico)

Unique documentary about the best freestylers around the world.
Freestyle Origins - Michal Rycaj "Michryc"
Unique documentary about the best freestylers around the world.

Freestyle Origins - Michal Rycaj "Michryc"

Unique documentary about the best freestylers around the world.
Freestyle Origins - Jhonny Peňa (Colombia)
Unique documentary about the best freestylers around the world.

Freestyle Origins - Jhonny Peňa (Colombia)

Unique documentary about the best freestylers around the world.
Freestyle Origins - Carlos Iacono "Charly" (Argentina)
Unique documentary about the best freestylers around the world.

Freestyle Origins - Carlos Iacono "Charly" (Argentina)

Unique documentary about the best freestylers around the world.
Freestyle Origins - Tobias Brandal Busaet (Norway)
Unique documentary about the best freestylers around the world.

Freestyle Origins - Tobias Brandal Busaet (Norway)

Unique documentary about the best freestylers around the world.
Freestyle Origins - Pawel Skóra (Poland)
Unique documentary about the best freestylers around the world.

Freestyle Origins - Pawel Skóra (Poland)

Unique documentary about the best freestylers around the world.
Freestyle Origins - Marvin Rodriguez (Mexico)
Unique documentary about the best freestylers around the world.

Freestyle Origins - Marvin Rodriguez (Mexico)

Unique documentary about the best freestylers around the world.
Freestyle Origins - Andrew Henderson (UK)
Unique documentary about the best freestylers around the world.

Freestyle Origins - Andrew Henderson (UK)

Unique documentary about the best freestylers around the world.
European championship 2017
Football festival Soccerex in Manchester, UK hosted the best freestylers from Europe to crown its champion for 2017

European championship 2017

Football festival Soccerex in Manchester, UK hosted the best freestylers from Europe to crown its champion for 2017
World Tour 2016 - Melbourne
After Calgary top 16 athletes clashed once again to gain final points to become ultimate world champion

World Tour 2016 - Melbourne

After Calgary top 16 athletes clashed once again to gain final points to become ultimate world champion
Asian Championship 2016
Davao city, Philippines hosted the best athletes from Asia to crown Asian champion 2016

Asian Championship 2016

Davao city, Philippines hosted the best athletes from Asia to crown Asian champion 2016
Red Bull Street Style - World final 2016
Red Bull for the first time in cooperation with offical association for sport invited national winners to London, UK

Red Bull Street Style - World final 2016

Red Bull for the first time in cooperation with offical association for sport invited national winners to London, UK
World Tour 2016 - Calgary
The best ranked athletes were invited to Calgary, Canada to compete for points to become ultimate world champion

World Tour 2016 - Calgary

The best ranked athletes were invited to Calgary, Canada to compete for points to become ultimate world champion
European Championship 2016
Copenhagen, Denmark hosted annual event for year 2016 to crown European champion.

European Championship 2016

Copenhagen, Denmark hosted annual event for year 2016 to crown European champion.
Super ball 2016
World open Freestyle Football championships for year 2016 was hosted by Liberec, Czech republic for the last time.

Super ball 2016

World open Freestyle Football championships for year 2016 was hosted by Liberec, Czech republic for the last time.
Asian Championship 2015
Annual event gathers the best freestyle football athletes to find Asian champion 2015 on Jakarta, Indonesia.

Asian Championship 2015

Annual event gathers the best freestyle football athletes to find Asian champion 2015 on Jakarta, Indonesia.
European Championship 2015
The best players from whole Europe came together to Amsterdam, The Netherlands, to fight for title of European champion.

European Championship 2015

The best players from whole Europe came together to Amsterdam, The Netherlands, to fight for title of European champion.
Super ball 2015
World open Freestyle Football championships for year 2015 happened again in czech city of Liberec at the end of summer.

Super ball 2015

World open Freestyle Football championships for year 2015 happened again in czech city of Liberec at the end of summer.
F3 World Tour 2014 - London
top 16 football freestylers showed in capital of United Kingdom what real ball control looks like.

F3 World Tour 2014 - London

top 16 football freestylers showed in capital of United Kingdom what real ball control looks like.
F3 World Tour 2014 - Beijing
1st stop of F3 World Tour showing top 16 players took place in capital of China, Asia.

F3 World Tour 2014 - Beijing

1st stop of F3 World Tour showing top 16 players took place in capital of China, Asia.
Super Ball 2014
World open Freestyle Football Championships 2014 held in Liberec, Czech republic.

Super Ball 2014

World open Freestyle Football Championships 2014 held in Liberec, Czech republic.
European Freestyle Football Championship 2014
2 star event where players from all around the Europe are battling for European champion title.

European Freestyle Football Championship 2014

2 star event where players from all around the Europe are battling for European champion title.
Red Bull Street Style World Final 2018 - documentary
Red Bull Street Style 2018 - qualification day
Freestylers take over Warsaw
Red Bull Street Style World Final 2018 (RB edit)
European championship 2018 - Berlin
African championship 2018
Red Bull Street Style - history (2008 - 2018)
World Masters 2018 - Tokyo
European Championship 2017 - Manchester
Red Bull Street Style 2016 World final
Super Ball 2016
World Tour 2016 - Melbourne, Australia
World Tour 2016 - Calgary
European Freestyle Football Championship 2016
North American Freestyle Football Championship 2015
Asian Freestyle Football Championship 2015
European Freestyle Football Championship 2015
Super ball 2015
Asian Freestyle Football Championship 2014
Football Freestylers take over the London
F3 World Tour 2014 - London
Super Ball 2014 - highlight
F3 World Tour 2014 - Beijing
European Freestyle Football Championship 2014 - highlight
F3WT 2014 - beijing highlight
Africa
Joel Asare -
Asia - Pacific
Aarish Ansari -
Hoai Nam Nguyen -
Europe
Lars Munck Petersen -
North America
Frankie Gonzalez -
South America
Martin Alvear Rodriguez -